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I have posted a few topics in the past and everyone has been very helpful. So I turn to your knowledge 1 more time.

I have a 2004 Rev gade 800 with 5200miles on it and it has been the best sled I've ever owned. Last year I heard that at or around 4,000 - 5,000 miles the sealed bearings in on the crank dry up and go bad. When that happens you might as well start over. I've also read on this forum that the rings can go bad and again when that happens it's very expensive to repair.

Here is my question. Are these things that alot of you have experienced and if so where do I start? I want to get this resolved BEFORE the riding season which is right around the corner. Thank you in advance for your replies.

Danbite.
 

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The mileage you indicated would lend itself to at least an engine inspection. Do a compression test and a leak down test to ascertain the top end condition. Check the coolant weep hole under the engine for signs of coolant seepage(not so bad) / oil leakage (real bad). The crankshaft end play will tell you more about the bottom end's condition than someone stating that Isoflex dries up... horse hockey!!!. If you want to see what the grease looks like:

On the PTO side there is a pipe nipple that Rotax uses for the factory fill of Isoflex. Remove the cap a slide a pipe cleaner down about 2". Pull it out and observe the color of the grease.

On the MAG side you need to remove the flywheel then the upper stator bolt to insert a pipe cleaner. Chances are, the MAG side seal is leaking already because that side of the crank becomes magnetic and all the crap sticks to the wee little seal Rotax put there.

Colors: White = good with < .002" end play the crank is good to go
Gray = lots of mileage and doesn't smell like gas still good to go but should be topped up with 20cc of fresh grease PTO side and 10cc MAG side
Black = bad news and smell of gas or injection oil + poor clutch kit (condition) + having the hell beaten out of the sled requires immediate action in the form of new bearings or crank.

Personally, I would open the engine and pro-actively freshen worn parts for peace of mind out there in the cold.
 
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