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tried starting 340 tx-l after sitting 7 years. started fine with a little gas down cylinders, however it revs way past idle and doesnt stop. had to hit the kill switch to keep it from blowing up. im not sure why it would do this. i cleaned the carbs and they appear to be working properly. any help or suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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how much gas did you dump in there? the crankcase could be loaded with fuel. there should be some drain plugs on the crankcase.[/b]
no more than a teaspoon for both cylinders. today it doesnt rev as high it runs around 4000 rpm.
but doesnt seem to want to idle down. it ran long enough to start pulling gas from the tank.but still no idle.
 

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Too much gas will never make it run too fast, all that ever does - if you get too much in there- is flood it. Your problem is more likely too much air, assuming the carbs are setting the idle by the idle screws and it's not because of sticky cables.

Cracked rubber carb adapters would be my initial thought since it has that many years since previous use. They simply break down over time. (If it has sat where there are electric motors in use or arc weldors, those both create ozone - O3- which is really bad for rubber parts.) If you do find that the rubber carb adapters appear to be cracked, put a turn or two of electrical tape around the cracks to see if you can get any improvement in idle speed. (Those things are quite spendy so there's no sense buying new ones if it won't solve the problem.) Don't rely on tape as a fix though as any leaking and leaning of your mixture is sure to haunt you. If that is the problem, cough up the dough and fix it right.

As long as we're talking leaks, make sure there are no other air leaks at the carb. The cover seals should be intact and sealing. So should the cable connections on the carb caps. Any of those rubber or rubber-like parts which are dry, cracked, or missing might allow air leaks which won't do your engine any good.
 

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Too much gas will never make it run too fast, all that ever does - if you get too much in there- is flood it. Your problem is more likely too much air, assuming the carbs are setting the idle by the idle screws and it's not because of sticky cables.

Cracked rubber carb adapters would be my initial thought since it has that many years since previous use. They simply break down over time. (If it has sat where there are electric motors in use or arc weldors, those both create ozone - O3- which is really bad for rubber parts.) If you do find that the rubber carb adapters appear to be cracked, put a turn or two of electrical tape around the cracks to see if you can get any improvement in idle speed. (Those things are quite spendy so there's no sense buying new ones if it won't solve the problem.) Don't rely on tape as a fix though as any leaking and leaning of your mixture is sure to haunt you. If that is the problem, cough up the dough and fix it right.

As long as we're talking leaks, make sure there are no other air leaks at the carb. The cover seals should be intact and sealing. So should the cable connections on the carb caps. Any of those rubber or rubber-like parts which are dry, cracked, or missing might allow air leaks which won't do your engine any good.[/b]
 

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"Too much gas will never make it run too fast, all that ever does - if you get too much in there- is flood it. Your problem is more likely too much air, assuming the carbs are setting the idle by the idle screws and it's not because of sticky cables"

yes it will. especially if the crankcase is loaded with fuel. i cant believe youve never heard of a two stroke running away from the crankcase filling with fuel from being on a stand. too much air wont cause a run away without fuel. ml
 

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Check crank seals. WL
 

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"Too much gas will never make it run too fast, all that ever does - if you get too much in there- is flood it. Your problem is more likely too much air, assuming the carbs are setting the idle by the idle screws and it's not because of sticky cables"

yes it will. especially if the crankcase is loaded with fuel. i cant believe youve never heard of a two stroke running away from the crankcase filling with fuel from being on a stand. too much air wont cause a run away without fuel. ml[/b]

That is a flooded condition. The best you can hope for is to hold the throttle down and give it enough air to haul that fuel through the engine. It will run rough but it gives plenty of warning to let off the throttle as it picks up rpms. Barring that, you need to pull the CC plugs and drain it. Gasoline does not burn well or right without being vaporized and properly mixed with air. If it's getting too much gas - and it could be- then it also needs to be getting extra air to make it burn/run well, in this case too fast.

It could be a crank seal problem, but that will often/usually make the engine hard to start and not want to run at idle, although it will likely run well- and hot (lean) - at higher speeds. I would look for a problem on the intake side.


tifa is right that it could be too much fuel. That also means too much air though so you need to find out why. (It is air that pulls the fuel in, not the other way.)
 

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thank you for the info ill be sure to try numerous suggestions, progress is slow so ill keep u updated. as of the last run it still wouldnt idle but i made no changes other than pulling and cleaning out the jets. the steering happens to be locked up, u cant turn the skis at all, it appears to have simple mechanics but i cant seem to see why it wont turn, could it have rusted or is it likely a bad bushing or pivot point. could their possibly be a steering lock i dont know about.
 

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The most likely cause of stuck steering is the column itself which runs behind the engine. That steel tube runs through an aluminum extrusion which is bolted to the bulkhead. Since they are two different metals, sometimes they will corrode in ways way worse than two steel parts can. The extrusion has a grease zerk which is sometimes difficult to access - which is why it gets neglected- and it will also sometimes snap off rather easily making the addition of grease almost impossible.

The easiest way to deal with that part if it is corroded is to remove it to soak in a light solvent - even diesel oil. However, removal is a huge problem requiring removal of the engine at the least. Consequently, it is worth using a cheaper aerosol to try and soak the ends of the aluminum extrusion (which are also protected by weldments on the column.) Heat can also sometimes be useful in breaking a stubborn steel/aluminum juncture but in that area it is not a good idea considering all the fuel and oil that runs through the area.

Lifting the skis ends to pull on them and work the joint loose is probably the least stressful to parts on the machine. If this gives you grief, it is surely something you'll never neglect to grease again on an annual basis.

(You might be tempted to try to grease it loose - and that might work. However, sometimes the grease will simply squeeze around the problem spot and then squeeze out the tube ends, blocking easier access for applying light penetrants.)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
it appears as though it is definately stuck through the extrusion shaft. iI didnt have much luck with penetrating fluids, i will probably resort to pulling the motor, that will also give me a chance to go over every thing a little more thuroughly. If u have any more suggestions i will gladly reply thanks for all the help, from everyone , its been invaluable.
 
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