Snowmobile World banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just got a 99 indy 340 deluxe, can anyone tell me why the belt on the driven clutch rides so high in the sheaves? The belt is a Polaris 3211058 which should be correct. Can the engine be moved to adjust the belt? I am attaching a picture for refernece. (hope it works)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,560 Posts
Unless your belt IS dragging (engine dragging/belt squealing), the belt sticking up like that is normal. Nothing to be concerned about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info. The belt does not squeal or creep. I have never seen a belt ride this high on any other snowmobile. I doesnt seem right, but if that is how they were made???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
I just got a 99 indy 340 deluxe, can anyone tell me why the belt on the driven clutch rides so high in the sheaves? The belt is a Polaris 3211058 which should be correct. Can the engine be moved to adjust the belt? I am attaching a picture for refernece. (hope it works)[/b]
Actually, it doesn't look right.

I have seen some sleds set up like this, but they were ususally out of adjustment. 63November is right in saying that spacers need to be added to the inside of the driven clutch (to keep the sheaves a little more open, dropping the belt down). The belt should be "mostly" inside the driven clutch, where it can contact more serface area of the belt / clutch. It is important to note that adding or subtracting washers (spacers) in the secondary can fix how the belt rides in the clutch, but change other crucial measurements such as belt deflection, etc. You have to spec the system out, and see what you have to see is such an adjustment is necessary.
I would, in the following order, check:

1) Belt deflection
2) Center to center measurement (crankshaft to jackshaft)
3) Parallelism
4) Offset

These adjustments are necessary to ensure that there is no undue wear / stress on the drive system. They will pay-off ten fold in the cost of belts / clutch / drive components.

Another thing to check is putting another drive belt on, and see how it fits. Some are manufactured a bit wider than others. You may find out that after checking all these parameters, that a specific belt, which is longer than most, rides higher in the secondary. At that point, you can suspect the belt, & replace it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,560 Posts
Maybe it's just me, but it looks like the belt on my sleds..... I suppose it could be just a tad high, but 1/8"-3/16" isn't too far out.

Earlier, I was assuming that the clutching was indeed set up somewhere close to spec. I get annal about it, going to great lengths insuring they are.... so from that standpoint, checking your center to center distance here might be a worthwhile investment.

I admit to running my belts snug. If it isn't creeping or squeeling - it's not hurting anything - and you have the benefit of starting at a lower gear ratio set up like this. Shim the secondary, and you'll gain belt deflection. This additional deflection will allow the belt to start higher in the primary, at a higher ratio - not a good thing. In many cases, this can cause a big stumble on low end.

If you'd like to mess around finding a shorter belt, then fine. But that's the way the stock belts have fit on my sleds since the late 80's when I started riding Polaris. -Al
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
When I first got the sled home, the belt that came with it was was worn, and was riding up about 1/8 inch. I put on a new belt, which was about riding up 1/4 inch above the secondary. The sled does not creep, but if I lift the rear up with the engine at idle, the track will move.

This is only my second Polaris, and I have not seen this on any other brand. The center shaft(s) distance looks to be right on (11.03") spec, but it is hard to measure accurately. I am guessing that I am going to need at least one washer installed in the secondary. I have to assume that someone at some time has had the seconday apart and has tampered with it. One more thing, the belt I put on is a 1995 year. Any chance that these things shrink with time?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
I agree with everyone else, is there any reason you want to drop it lower in the secondary other because it looks too high? As it sits now it will give better bottom end like michahicks said. If the sled doesn't creep, a little track spin on the stand is okay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
I wouldn't assume that it has been apart just because it lacks space. There is a bit of wear inside under normal use which allows the sheaves to close more as wear progresses. I would differ with the advice not to shim it open a bit. I don't like a machine to want to creep when running. Trying to stop and sit at idle on a downhill slope may cause probelms at some time. (That machine has no parking brake, correct?) If it's nearly creeping now, in the not so distant future it will likely start to drag enough that it may be hard to start cold.

At least try to open the clutch up. Sometimes it takes awhile to convince the splined helix to come free on the corresponding shaft. You may have to wait for some Aero-Kroil or something to work so it might be good to get a start before you actually have a functioning problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
A little track spin with the back end in the air is completely normal. My Fusion has always done that, with Polaris adjusting the clutch and on two different belts got the same result (1080 and 1098). If it works the way it should, and doesn't sqeek, then what it means is it should last a long time before dropping low enough to need to replace it again.

If it already works: don't fix it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
The 340 sleds with the P-90 clutches will have the cords showing on the secondary with a new belt. In most cases the deflection will be correct and the sled will not creep. Spacing the driven open to set belt height kinda flush will result in too much deflection and burnt the belt on take-off. The P-90 clutches are the exception to the normal rule of thumb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
The 340 sleds with the P-90 clutches will have the cords showing on the secondary with a new belt. In most cases the deflection will be correct and the sled will not creep. Spacing the driven open to set belt height kinda flush will result in too much deflection and burnt the belt on take-off. The P-90 clutches are the exception to the normal rule of thumb.[/b]
Learn something new every day, eh? I did not know that... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
It is not normal for the low horsepower machines to turn a raised track at idle.......never seen one which did unless the wear in the clutch had caught up to it. (I don't like to chase parked rigs downhill either!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
It is not normal for the low horsepower machines to turn a raised track at idle.......never seen one which did unless the wear in the clutch had caught up to it. (I don't like to chase parked rigs downhill either!)[/b]
not sure about the polaris's but my 380 used to creep at idle with a raised track, the whole time we had since brand new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
not sure about the polaris's but my 380 used to creep at idle with a raised track, the whole time we had since brand new.[/b]
We're talking raised tracks, not lowered ones. My brothers 500XC/SP used to creep with the track down when he first bought it, with/without him on it. Come to think of it... that shouldn't have been happening...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
We're talking raised tracks, not lowered ones. My brothers 500XC/SP used to creep with the track down when he first bought it, with/without him on it. Come to think of it... that shouldn't have been happening...[/b]

Yeah, I know. Thats why i said " ..at idle with a raised track". It should not move the sled forward at idle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Snowobiles of any make or model, should absolutely, definitely never creep at idle, with the track resting on the ground!!! They will, however, even when properly set-up, spin the track when up on a stand. This will usually happen when the drag on the drive system is the least, ie: track, chaincase & belt are warmed-up. If they spin the track anytime the machine is up on a stand, there's something out of adjustment, and you're burning up your belt.

Regardless of how high this guy's belt rides in his secondary, if it doesn't look right, check to make sure that everything is adjusted properly. Then make the determination of what's good, bad or indifferent! The whole concept of if it works, leave it alone is absolute nonsense. The people who really believe that deserve to walk home from their busted ride!!

If he gets his sled checked-out, and everything is good, and the belt happens to ride that high, and slowly spins the track when on a a stand warmed-up at idle...great! At least he knows that it's set-up OK. What he's looking for is some direction on what he should do about it, if anything. All this "my sled does this" and "my sled does that" isn't helping him, 'caus your sleds might not be set up right either.

If it doesn't look right, get it checked-out!!! Belts and drive components are too expensive these days to start looking for ways to opt-out of giving your sled the service it deserves
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
Ok, I'll re-post this:

"The 340 sleds with the P-90 clutches will have the cords showing on the secondary with a new belt. In most cases the deflection will be correct and the sled will not creep. Spacing the driven open to set belt height kinda flush will result in too much deflection and burnt the belt on take-off. The P-90 clutches are the exception to the normal rule of thumb."

Meaning: out of experience his sled IS set up right. Obviously, he will get it checked out, otherwise he wouldn't have posted it on this forum. He would have simply said "henh" and rode away anyway. He's doing his research, by now he knows how his sled should be set up, and he's already made the appropriate adjustments, and we're arguing about a topic that's long over.

PS he did say his sled NEVER creeped, but did spin the track a little when warmed up on the stand. According to your instructions, his sled is set up right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,679 Posts
Ok, I'll re-post this:

"The 340 sleds with the P-90 clutches will have the cords showing on the secondary with a new belt. In most cases the deflection will be correct and the sled will not creep. Spacing the driven open to set belt height kinda flush will result in too much deflection and burnt the belt on take-off. The P-90 clutches are the exception to the normal rule of thumb."

Meaning: out of experience his sled IS set up right. Obviously, he will get it checked out, otherwise he wouldn't have posted it on this forum. He would have simply said "henh" and rode away anyway. He's doing his research, by now he knows how his sled should be set up, and he's already made the appropriate adjustments, and we're arguing about a topic that's long over.

PS he did say his sled NEVER creeped, but did spin the track a little when warmed up on the stand. According to your instructions, his sled is set up right.[/b]
Agreed, sounds like his sled is set up perfectly.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top