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Every year at about this time I remove and replace my and my families and freinds rear suspensions. This is the biggest pain in the butt. I would rather be hit with a sledge hammer. The following is the way I have been doing it.
1- Install front of suspension to tunnel.
2- Compress the rear of the suspension lightly and hold it in
   place with a few large tie wraps.
3- Raise the rear of the sled
4- Use a 2x4 under the track to motivate the carriage into place.
5- Comence to throw out profanities at the sled while fighting with the darn aluminum pivot blocks that refuse to move to there mounting position.
6- After about an hour or so when done I stop and drink beer so as not to take the sledge hammer and proceed to beat the sled in to flower pot.
 

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Do you have a block and tackle or something to make raising the rear of the machine easier? I have an SRX and remove my suspension every year. I think its funny how everyone talks about how difficult it is to remove/install the skids on Yamahas. I use a pulley system that hangs from the ceiling of my garage and I can install the skid on my SRX in about 15 minutes (without exageration) by myself. Its just a matter of getting a routine down. After a while it gets easy.
 

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If you can get the tension off the springs its alot easier to get the TSL blocks to line up(I saw you have ACs in your signature).  What I did is make a tool that makes it easy to take the springs off and to put them back on.  Its basically an L shaped square tube about a foot by 5 inches with a pipe welded in a whole in the bottom of the short part that you can slide the end of the spring through.
 

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I raise rear end of sled and tie it off to a rafter in garage with
a tie down strap, this allows for adjustment up and down.
I then use yet a nother tie down strap and colapse rear suspension arm to give you free play to pull the skid from the track. Remove the four bolts that hold the skid to the tunnel and take my very large prybar starting at the rear pry up on the skid to get it over the inner lugs on the track once it's over a little bit the whole skid pulls out pretty easily. Reinstall
is just about the same, sometimes I use yet another tie down and use it to pull on the slack in the track. Stuff the nose in
first and use the pry bar to leverage the skid over the inner lugs on the track. Use the rear strap to give you the proper up and down movment of the sled to get the front bolts lined up and the move to the rear.
 

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For whatever it's worth, I use a come along attached to a reinforced rafter at the top, then on the bottom, through a hole in the track, to the rear axle. Yea, it's a little struggle, but not that big of a deal with the sled and track weight pulling everything back. Usually able to do them by myself.

AL
 

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This is my exp. Being able to adjust the height of the sled is key. Come along, rafter etc. What ever you can get your hands on. Then with a Cat, I use the ratchet strap to compress the skid. (Only when reinstalling) Another big help that I haven't heard anyone mention is to backoff the track tention all the way. Then beat in the boggie wheels from the rear. This will make the skid as small as possible. This usually works well. The only time I had a big problem was when we were installing a new track and it wasn't stretched yet. That was a tight fit. I wish I had a chain fall at my house. We use one at my brother in laws and it makes it a breeze. The older Polaris skids you can take the spring off basically.
I don't understand how you are taking the spring tension off on a Cat. The short end slides through that plastic triangle slide thing (don't know the word for that part) and the other end is attached. Please try and explain that pipe deal again. Sounded pretty good.
 

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I use a turn buckle to pull the suspention down a little, raise the sled with a come-a long slide it in, lower the sled down close to where it needs to be and let the turn buckle out to line up the holes, of course you always start with the front first. works for me with little cussi'n.
 

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Compressing the suspension with a tie-down strap seems to be common.  I've used this also with good success.  The rest will take care of its self once the skid is compressed.
 

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You guys are scaring me. I got my skd out with no problems and figured putting it back in should be the same. I hope it will be.
 

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I used to do that, but then I found the light!

turn your sled over to the left side. Let it rest on the ski and place some wood blocks under the tunnel and whatever else may contact the ground(not to scratch it)

once the rear bolts are out you can swing the suspension freely

On some models you may have to plug the coolent resevoir overflow

good luck
 

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Buy a Mar-lift.It was worth every penny.We bought one at the supertrax show last year for $300.00 canuck bucks. We use it for the sleds and 4 wheelers
 
It may make this job a little easier.
 

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rfmckee see if the makes more sense sometimes i have trouble explaining stuff like this.  What I do is take a pry bar and lift the short end of the bar enough so I can slide the triangle block off.  Then this bar with the hole acts as a lever so you can lift the short end of the spring over the peg and forward releasing the tension on the spring.  Its basically how an AC dealer replaces the springs and its less clumsy then using a tiedown to compress the skid in my opinion.  I also use a lift to hold the tunnel up.  I will take a pic and post it for you its nothing fancy only took me about 10mins to make and has saved me alot of time.
 

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after doing it 2 or 3 times it becomes fairly routine :sleeping:
 

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Originally posted by zr500@Sep 26 2002, 09:31 PM
rfmckee see if the makes more sense sometimes i have trouble explaining stuff like this.  What I do is take a pry bar and lift the short end of the bar enough so I can slide the triangle block off.  Then this bar with the hole acts as a lever so you can lift the short end of the spring over the peg and forward releasing the tension on the spring.  Its basically how an AC dealer replaces the springs and its less clumsy then using a tiedown to compress the skid in my opinion.  I also use a lift to hold the tunnel up.  I will take a pic and post it for you its nothing fancy only took me about 10mins to make and has saved me alot of time.
Thanks. I think I got it. So your lifting off the top section of the spring. The end that rides on the adjustment cam. Not the other end. Cool. Have to try that. A pic of that bar would be cool.
 
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Originally posted by madsledhead@Sep 27 2002, 12:19 PM
I used to do that, but then I found the light!

turn your sled over to the left side. Let it rest on the ski and place some wood blocks under the tunnel and whatever else may contact the ground(not to scratch it)

once the rear bolts are out you can swing the suspension freely

On some models you may have to plug the coolent resevoir overflow

good luck
Now we have someone who has seen the light. I found it is easiest this way.
 

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Here a pic rfmckee. Its not a real good picture but gives you an idea. The pipe that you see at the end of the short chunk sticks through both sides about 1/2 inch or so.
 

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Thanks ZR 500. Just pulled her off the trailer last night and put her in the garage. It was great to have motor head again.
 
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