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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I have had older sleds all my life (carb, liquid cooled) but I finally upgraded to a 2006 Crossfire 7.

I was told that I should ONLY use synthetic (I guess the AC APV oil) because I have the power valves. Is this true or can I used regular injection oil or semi-synethic and other brands as well and does it make a big difference?

Also, can anyone recommend a break in procedure?

Thanks in advance!
 

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I run amsoil interceptor in my power valved sleds,,,, The firecat has always had great looking power valves when I clean them in the summer, but the f6 had some gumming going on. It was pig rich and drank oil this winter, but even with the minor gumming, they were not sticking at all.
Comparing the price of the cat synthetic to the price of amsoil interceptor makes the amsoil an easy choice.
As long as your running a high quality oil that is made for power valves, you will be fine. It doent have to be amsoil, I am just familiar with them.
 

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Should have bought the Shell Ultra Synthetic last week at Crappy Tire

Reg $39 on for $24 a 4liter
 

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Drive it like you stole it...But only after you throw the stock 4" carbides away, and replace them with atleast 8" singles. They like to be ridden hard on DIRT too.[/b]

Just make sure you let it warm up real good before you do that.

Then \/ \/ \/ \/
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the advice,

Ok, so I don't need to do anything different when I am driving it for the first little while? Full throttle ahead, right off the bat?
 

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thanks for the advice,

Ok, so I don't need to do anything different when I am driving it for the first little while? Full throttle ahead, right off the bat?[/b]
no let it warm up for a 10- 15 minutes then go easy on it untill you have ridden a while then full throttle ahead
 

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some people believe in letting them warm up then breaking them in hard. others feel that running at NO constant speeds and nothing over 3/4 throttle for the first 25-30 mile is the way to go. I have heard arguements both ways on the proper way that really make sense,,, I myself break mine in at varying speeds,,, nothing constant. I do some full throttle runs, but I dont hold them there long at all. After the first tank of gas, I then run a little harder,,, still varying rpms,,, then the third tank of gas its go like crazy. Not saying its the best way as opions differ on the subject, but its how I do it.
Make sure you have 100 to 1 oil in the tank for your first tank. When I got my sled, the dealer filled them with fuel and put the oil in right there,,, part of the deal I guess. Good luck with your new ride.
 

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some people believe in letting them warm up then breaking them in hard. others feel that running at NO constant speeds and nothing over 3/4 throttle for the first 25-30 mile is the way to go. I have heard arguements both ways on the proper way that really make sense,,, I myself break mine in at varying speeds,,, nothing constant. I do some full throttle runs, but I dont hold them there long at all. After the first tank of gas, I then run a little harder,,, still varying rpms,,, then the third tank of gas its go like crazy. Not saying its the best way as opions differ on the subject, but its how I do it.
Make sure you have 100 to 1 oil in the tank for your first tank. When I got my sled, the dealer filled them with fuel and put the oil in right there,,, part of the deal I guess. Good luck with your new ride.[/b]
This is pretty much what I meant. Let it warm up so as not to cold seize. Vary it, with full throttle bursts. I usually count to 10 if I'm going full throttle, then let off. Again, no constant speeds. But do not just run it on a stand or something without a load. That is the worst thing you can do. You need a load on the engine. Otherwise you don't get any pressure to seat the rings. THat is the whole key to this. You have to seat the rings. I'm going nuts with a new sled sitting in the garage, and I can't run it. I NEED SNOW!!!!!
 
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