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I am wondering if you can trail ride a 02 arctic cat snopro with out blowing it up, if so what do you need to do to make it trail rideable? Also will it beat a 600 of any make? Thank you.
 

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Not sure if its got the high compression heads, if it does you will need to get different heads that are made to run 91 octane, otherwise your going to have to run 110 octane race gas. Also, its not oil injected, so your going to have to pre-mix oil and gas. Unless you want to install and oil injections system. will be much better for trail riding that way.
 

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It was oil injected?? I thought everything after 01 was premix. maybe its only the MXZX and PRO X
 

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No, Arctic Cat 2002 Sno- Pros were all oil injected. Yes the Pro-X and MXZX are not oil injected and it seems Arctic Cat has went that way for 2003 and got rid of the oil injection system for the Sno Pro. I don't know about the trailablity for the Sno- Pro but i would imagine with a few jetting changes you could ride it on the trail and maybe retarding the timing a few degrees to richen it. I am no mechanic so I really don't know. You will have to get some better advice from someone who knows more about them. Goodluck.
 

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I'm with Auggie. Set the timing advance nob on the lowest setting and leave it alone.
 

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"I am wondering if you can trail ride a 02 arctic cat snopro with out blowing it up, if so what do you need to do to make it trail rideable? Also will it beat a 600 of any make? Thank you"

These answers relate to experience with a 2000 Sno-Pro. Basically the same goes for the newer ones, except this years 2003 sled which requires race gas.

1. Using stock jetting, you should be okay. But you will want to play it safe and retard the timing one or two degrees. (You could retard it all the way, most Sno-Pro trail riders retard it a couple of degrees, haven't heard of guys using -3 degrees but it couldn't hurt much).

2. Do not JET DOWN, see point one above. If you are going to jet, jet up sizes but not down.

Now this is dependent on altittude and trail conditions, but it's better to err on the side of safety.

My friend jetted down two sizes per instructions from a guy at a dealer who "thought" you could jet it down for where we were riding. Result, one burned piston and about $500 repair bill.

3. Your running 92, 93 octane. Obviously. In Michigan, some stations in the UP sell only the premium for the reason that some of us need the higher octane. If your riding in the UP where they sell both early in the season be aware that early in the season that high octane gas may have been sitting in the pump all summer long because many Yupers don't require or use high octane 92. So the first few weeks the gas might not be as good in some areas. Better to gas up the sled in your area, carry a bit of dry gas in your trailer and be on the look out for possible bad gas performance.

4. Can't speak for other brands, but the 2000 Sno-Pro will take a ZR600 up to 60 mph. Between 60 and 80 MPH the ZR600 will pass it. So for 300 to 350 feet you will be even or ahead of the ZR600 which means on the trails when opening up you'll have as much pulling power and grunt/speed. On longer runs (500 ft drags, 660 ft drags) the ZR600 and other 600's will beat you. That's the way the Sno-Pro's are. They are geared for low end pull and holeshots and do well under 60 MPH. After all they are built for Sno-Cross not 1/4 mile drags.

As a trail sled, the Sno-Pro's work excellent. They are one of the funnest sleds to have on the trails expecially when things get nasty out there with big bumps. They love to eat up that kind of stuff. For overall trail conditions twisting trails, some straight aways, you'll not have to worry about being left behind unless your running with big triples and the guys are on rail trails and pegging it trying to go 100+ for long stretches. (Not to many guys do that.) My friends on a T-Cat and Sno-Pro were riding "bullet train" style with a T-Cat and Sno-Pro. The T-Cat could obviously pull away at the start, but since they were topping out at only about 90MPH the Sno-Pro had no problems keeping up.

ONE THING TO CHECK ON ALL SNO-PROS to be safe.
One thing you may want to check is to verify the lower bolt of the A-Arm on the front ski is tightly coupled with the shaft of the "reverse" mounted shock. My friend had a shock fall off when the shock came unscrewed with his 2000 Sno-Pro. The shock rebuilder told us (and the manual confirms this) that this piece is left on when the shocks are rebuilt, so it wasn't the fault of the guy rebuilding the shocks. AC must not have screwed in that piece tight enough for his particular sled and when it came off he was only going 15 MPH on some powder jumps in a rail trail, fortunately we didn't have the shock fall off when he was doing 70 on a side road minutes earlier.

Have fun

Greg
 
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