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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know it's a newbie question, but...What type of oil do I use in my chaincase. I see on the sticker it only calls for about 8 oz., but no mention of weight or type. Please feel free to hand me my "stupid" sign later.
 

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That's not a stupid question. If you don't know it, you don't know.

Yamaha specifies using the following:

SAE #75 or #80 Gear Oil

I use two different types: #75w90 and #80w90.
Synthentic is really a waste of money, especially since this oil should be changed at least seasonally. Gears simply need oil, and they don't care how expensive the stuff is they're running through. Just keep the moisture out and keep an eye on the level and tension of the chain.

Jon
 

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One little piece of advise . This may sound weird and wrong but if your dip stick has a magnet on the end just remove it. If you do it you will be happy if you don't you will feel the magnets wraith.
 

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I have always used amsoil chaincase oil in all my sleds and have had no problems at all,,,,
 

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Just a quick question regarding the chain case oil responses. First off, regarding the comment on the magnet. What did you mean by removing the magnet. What specific "wrath" should I expect to feel?
And secondly, regarding the 90 weight oil.... I just got my sled serviced (I helped do everything along side the mechanic) and had to refill the chaincase after changing the track. His comments on the oil make a lot of since. Why would you put a 90 weight oil in your chaincase being that most of the time you are riding the sled are in 0-25/30 degree weather. Do you realize what 90 weight oil pours like in around 0 degrees? At that point, you mine as well use straight grease, because that will be the consistency of your oil. We used a 40 or 50 weight oil. Being the hydraulics of a Komatsu excavator use straight 40 weight oil for their hydraulics, I think that 40 weight oil will be sufficient to do the job for the little (comparison wise to 40-hr/wk work of a excavator) riding that we do on sleds. Just my $.02
 

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Your mechanic needs to reference the Yamaha service manuals more often when it comes to using the specified oil for the machine. Had he checked, he would have found that #75 or #80 Gear Oil is recommended for the chaincase. These are both 90 weight oils. Both my bottles explain "excellent cold weather properties." Also, these oils are in most transfer cases, differentials, and other gear driven cases which operate in all conditions from north to south. Gear cases do not need the same oils for operation (consistency of oil) as do engines. Engines need lubrication typically by way of a pump. Gears are lubricated through 'splash'. Therefore, consistency really is comparing apples and oranges for these different uses.

Jon
 

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I understand where you are comming from and am aware of the yamaha specifications, I am just somewhat suspect on the need to use such a heavy weight oil. To each their own though I guess, but what it really comes down to is lubrication is lubrication regardless of how it is applied. Most engines use pretty standard 30 or 40 weight oil for roughly 3000 miles of application. Assuming that you put on that or less in a season, I look at it like "if a vehicle piston rings and walls use that oil, why would it be different to use in a chain case? Just matter of opinion.
 

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I suppose I also understand your thoughts, however with that logic:

(" Most engines use pretty standard 30 or 40 weight oil for roughly 3000 miles of application. Assuming that you put on that or less in a season, I look at it like "if a vehicle piston rings and walls use that oil, why would it be different to use in a chain case? Just matter of opinion.")

one could argue why you don't put regular 5w30 in your injection reservoir instead of injection oil. Or how about motor oil in the transmission? I'm not knocking you, but rather looking for information as I'm no oil expert myself.

Jon
 

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guess you lost me too,,, there is no way I would ever put 30 or 40 weight oil in my chaincase,,, but then again, its simply because I have always used amsoil synthetic and it is a 90 weight oil,,,, my dad always used simply 90 weight gear oil,,, I have always been taught that that is what you use and it is reccomended in every manufacturers sled that I have ever owned,,,,
 

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I still believe it has to do with the thickness of oil and oil lines and pumps. Gear oil is just that, gear oil. It's splash lubricated and doesn't require the the use of a pump and oil lines from which to acquire its oil. I agree, if you use the wrong oil in an engine or hydraulic pump or transmission with cold temps, one would probably not only over work the pump, but it would take a lot longer to get the thicker oil thru the lines to the areas which are needing lubrication. On the other hand, gears are already being bathed in it and produce their own heat to quickly warm it up.

Jon
 

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Have always used 80w90 in all our sleds, all four manufacturer's and never had a chaincase failure. Oh, and I leave the magnet in to keep the filings in the gears to a minimum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just a little update. I did check with our local Yamaha dealer, who (of course) indicated YamaLube chaincase oil should be used. In his next breath, he also indicated that 80W90 gear oil will serve the same purpose and is as close as you can get to the YamaLube Oil. A factor that needs to be taken into account when we are talking about "why" a certain weight oil is used in a certain application is mechanics. I assume that the gears in the chaincase are running at a pretty hefty RPM and a heavier oil is needed to reduce oil "slinging" or oil being spun off the gears and chain. In any event I went with the 80W90 and saved myself a little cash, since I had it already.

As a side, I would imagine a chaincase failure would be a pretty catastrophic event. Can someone describe one for me? Try to include sounds so that I can get the complete effect. :huh:
 

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i use mobile 1 75-90w full synthetic used it for years no chain case problems
change it every year oil still looks very clean also flows good in cold weather
 

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I use Shell synthetic chaincase oil from Canadian Tire. ($8 bottle) That's good for 2 fills. If you don't use a chain CASE oil, the oil can foam up too much inside the chaincase and POSSIBLY blow your seal. Also, before I put the chain case oil in, I always spray the chain with a high RPM chain oil. It comes in a spray can and is VERY sticky. That way it doesn't fly off the chain when it is spinning. I do this because if I EVER blow my chain case seal, I should be able to carefully (at lower RPM's) Limp the sled home without the chain drying out, heating up, and snapping. I have an older machine, so I ALWAYS have to be prepared for the worst! I think I break down every trip I take. lol
If you wanna know what a snapping chain is like.......it can be as minor as hearing a clunk and the machine just sitting there and not moving when you rev it up. or it can be as bad as the chain catching on the drive shaft binding it up and the machine comming to a dead stop. Or I've even seen snapped chains go through a chaincase and stripping the teeth off the gears causing about $400 damage.
 

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Last season the chain snapped in my '97 Storm SE.

What a mess. The chain piled up and shredded both the top and lower sprocket as well as blowing the side of the chaincase itself out. The reverse idler also got hammered and the main reverse gear at the bottom got slightly damaged.

To top it off when it went I was doing about 80 mph wide open (accelerating hard) after the motor screamed for a second or two I realized I couldn't stop. The sled coasted for a few hundred feet (making horrible noises) before the track suddenly locked up and I skidded to a stop. I had shut the motor down the instant I let go of the throttle - it was a strange "silent ride" with the snapping and clanking sound from the chaincase and no brakes.

Just a few minutes earlier I was riding through a twisty forest. It would have been even worse had it gone there.

I was running Polaris chain lube at the time.
 
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