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I have no one around in my neck of the woods (Tennessee) to ask but here goes . . . .

I run a bass boat and I fish in freezing temps. Winter time is one of the best times of year in TN to get into some great fishing. I generally run about 75mph on the water for a few miles to my spot if I'm fishing a tournament. In March, our tournaments begin and it is possible that I'll be running in 32 deg temps.

I have had problems with my hands getting too cold while running in cold temps. This has led to the early stages of hypothermia. If fish by myself alot so I need some good gloves. Do you guys have any recommendations for a cold weather glove made to keep the wind at high speeds from sucking the heat right out of my body? I have to have dexterity to flip swiches and such on the console and GPS unit.

The gloves I can get at Walmart with the thinsulate just don't cut it. I could use any advice and I figured that if anybody would understand running in freezing cold and possibly wet conditions, it would be the snowmobiling guys. Thanks for any advice.

Thanks,
Duane
 

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I have no one around in my neck of the woods (Tennessee) to ask but here goes . . . .

I run a bass boat and I fish in freezing temps. Winter time is one of the best times of year in TN to get into some great fishing. I generally run about 75mph on the water for a few miles to my spot if I'm fishing a tournament. In March, our tournaments begin and it is possible that I'll be running in 32 deg temps.

I have had problems with my hands getting too cold while running in cold temps. This has led to the early stages of hypothermia. If fish by myself alot so I need some good gloves. Do you guys have any recommendations for a cold weather glove made to keep the wind at high speeds from sucking the heat right out of my body? I have to have dexterity to flip swiches and such on the console and GPS unit.

The gloves I can get at Walmart with the thinsulate just don't cut it. I could use any advice and I figured that if anybody would understand running in freezing cold and possibly wet conditions, it would be the snowmobiling guys. Thanks for any advice.

Thanks,
Duane[/b]
Duane,

Keep your Walmart gloves and tape Hotshots to your wrists. They are available at most sport supply stores and stay warm for up to 8 hours. Depending on your tolerance o heat you may need to wrap them in a sock before attaching them to your wrists. Be sure to tape them to the tops of your wrists to warm the blood circulation going into your hands and fingers.

Good Luck !
 

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To be able to wire them and still have full rotation of the steering wheel might be a bit hard to pull off, but what you need is a steering wheel warmer. Maybe you could find a nice Cadillac heated wheel and fab it in?
Or maybe an under grip style heating element on the handle of your favorite rod?

Hmmmm, I may be on to something here, a fishing rod with a built in grip heater. :thumbsup:

Anyway, I have a few members of the family that are very susceptible to the cold, especially in their hands. On the sled it is no problem because the hand warmers keep them happy, but once we stop or if we are just out hiking or walking the dogs, the the small "hot shot" instant warmer packs that TD is talking about always save the day.

You can also try heated gloves (which we have tried and worked ok) but we got tired or replacing batteries.
 

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On sleds we have heated hand grips and throttles, boats may be a little difficult for that. Go to
www.gerbing.com , they have heated gloves, vests, and other items that should run off of your boats electrical sytem, similar to a motorcycle.
 

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get a pair of ski gloves. they are made t o withstad wind and some water. I have the Scott Gloves back nine leather glove and it is thin enough that you can still do things like tie off ropes and such but I have worn them in 20 degree temps and my hands were warm.I recomend that or the spring glove or the worker glove.

Back nine

Spring glove

Worker
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the feedback. You all have given me some great ideas.

I like the idea of the electric gloves.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Better question is.....How do you keep your line from freezing in the eyelets??[/b]

Good question! Ice does form on the rod line guides and on the reel spool but it is slushy and flicks off. I've had my best days while fishing when its snowing. We're always casting and reeling in bass fishing (bait is always in motion) so the line is in motion and doesn't freeze. The monofilament I use doesn't seem to be impacted as much by freezing temps. When I'm using a bait caster and I'm fishing a tube bait off the bottom, I keep a finger and thumb on the line to detect bites and to control backlash when casting.

I have a pair of the neoprene gloves that have the flip back tips for your index finger and thumb which works out well.

I bookmarked the Gerbings website - electric gloves may be the ticket.
 

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We fish the big lakes in April just as the ice is leaving, it gets cold in the boat, we all use neoprene gloves they seem to work the best ...The ones we have are not too big and bulky and keep your hands warm, and dry ....They are kind of pricey but are worth it ......
 
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