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On my 93 Yamaha, the driven clutch has several possible spring positionings. On the inside of the clutch, there is a hole by each of the plastic dogs. Lettered A, B, C. And on the helix, there are 4 holes numbered 1,2,3,4.
Could someone please explain what effect changing the spring position would have on the machine's performance? Also, if changing the spring postition on the driven clutch, does the primary clutch's settings have to be changed as well?

thanks.
 

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More side / radial tension on the driven clutch will make it resist up shifting and more sensitive to track input. Also the back shift will be quicker (will gear down more rapidly) when you release the throttle and get back on it. Mechanically it will provide more squeeze on the belt. Relaxing the driven clutch side / radial tension will allow it to reach full shift out sooner and remain there longer on deceleration (less sensitive to track input). More chance of belt slippage (heat).
 

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doc says what happens, question is why are you changing it?
 

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I would add that more tension also has a tendency to raise engine rpm at "cruise" speeds. Even small changes can be very noticable on longer rides. Would suggest that on a 93 sled, you might want to install a fresh spring at the factory settings to see where you are at before getting too creative. Almost gauranteed original springs (primary AND secondary) have lost some of their original tension. From there, go for it. Dial it in to your riding style. It can make a big difference in how the sled performs for you.
 
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