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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This might seem like a stupid question but ...

What exactly is fogging an engine, why does one do it, and HOW does one do it. I read through the users manual for my cousins XCR 700 and it says to fog it to store for summers (or something like that) and I wanted to know why.

Feel free to laff at me :p , poke fun :D , make jokes etc... but if you don't mind a little help would be appreciated :)
 

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weasil, you fog an engine so keep it oiled up for the sumer. it will prevent the cylinders from rusting etc...im pretty sure you fog the engine by sprayying the fogging oil into the intake because im pretty sure that s what i did to my jetskis for the winter hope this helps. Also i am not 100 % sure about what i said lol so feel free to correct me ne 1 :thumbsup:
Jarett
 

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WeaSil
Crash Course - Fogging 101

Most dealerships and parts stores carry fogging oil. Unprotected engine parts are prone to rusting. While it is true that your a 2 stroke burns oil it normally doesn't hang onto the parts inside for very long. First pull the airbox off. Start engine. With one hand on the throttle use the other hand or a buddy to spray directly into the carbs. One at a time and use lots. It's gonna smoke and stink but don't worry. I usually keep it running just long enough to get both cylinders coated real good and then try and stall it or chock it with the oil. Once shut off i pull the plugs and spray extra oil into the cylinders. Remember you're not just trying to coat the cylinders but all internal parts and bearings.
 

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:withstupid:
Yah... what he said! lol

Unless it's EFI, fogging is the right thing to do.
EFI from what I have been told by 2 good dealers... run them every couple of weeks! As a touch of insurance, I use mechanics wire and tie up my oil pump to a about 1/2 way open. Normaly at idle, the oil pump arm hasn't move and the engine runs on very little oil. This way I give it a bit of gas and a lot of oil... keeps the bugs away too!
Some may disagree... but this works good for my sled. No problems so far!!
 

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I learned the hard way about fogging ;)

I used to never fog my engines

But ended on my 1st ride in Nov 95 when my crank seized on my Indy 500 after only 20minutes on the 1st ride :(

Upon further inspection,the crank bearings had some rust

$800 later I learnt my lesson :doh:

So you cannot fog an efi ???

What happens if you cannot get to your sled every 2weeks ;)

What do you do with efi outboards ;) for winter storage
 

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Well... not to sure on that one. I would guess that you could fog it the same... the problem is the injectors. Once a Carbed sled is fogged, you pull the float bowls and drain the fuel... no such luck on EFI! And you don't want fuel sitting in the injectors for 7 months!!
When I bought my sled, I called a my dealer (Birch Point Cats) and told him what I had bought... I wanted to get a preseason done on it. But I had already done some work, rear skid, did the clutches, but I wanted him to give the motor a once over... he says "EFI... you have already done your preseason if you have done all that I had done!"
The only thing that was suggested is to run injector cleaner through it on the first tank of the season.
There must be away to do outboards ???
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ahhhhhh.... now I understand.

Sounds like I will be going out to get some fogging oil this weekend :)

I would cry like a little girl (no offence to any little girls here) if I went out on my new (to me at least) sled and it coughed and died the first time out :(


Thanks everyone.
 

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Just my two cents. On my EFI's I have always fogged them like mentioned above with the addition of running some fuel stabilizer through the motor. I can't usually get to my sled in the summer to run the engine periodically. In the fall, I siphon out the old gas as much as I can and fill it with fresh gas and add some fuel injector cleaner. I have never had any problems doing this.
 

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Benjir,

Where as starting the engine every week during the off season may keep the carbs from gumming up (movement of the fuel through the system), it will create moisture in your cylinders upon shut down (heating and then cooling). The effects of moisture from the constant starting and shut down also affect the internal exhaust. This moisture will cause more harm after time than not starting your engine at all.

I'd personally summarize it (stabilizer, fogging, draining, greasing, etc...), and then leave 'er alone until you're getting ready for the season.

I'm definitely no engine expert, but oil coated metal tends to resist rust and corrosion far better than moisture.

Jon
 

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Originally posted by ecopter@Sep 5 2003, 10:39 PM
This moisture will cause more harm after time than not starting your engine at all.



It should be mentioned that if you run your engine periodically in the summer it is extremely important to get it, and the pipes hot. This will eliminate the condensation on cool down.
Personally, I do the fogging thing and drain carbs
 

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Do the fogging, oil on crank bearings is most important, especially the lower rod bearing

Remember, sleds are stored in the summer heat therefore causing more varnish (gumming) of the carbs due to fuel sitting, an outboard is generally stored in the winter cold months which will not form as much varnish in the carbs.

Drain the carbs!!

also
Did I mention, drain the carbs!!

got it?
 

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As a few others said, the crank bearings are the main reason to fog. Even if they don't rust enough to seize, they can get a light coat of rust that will cause excessive wear at start-up and shorten their life.

For EFI guys:

You can and should fog an EFI, and it's actually easier than a carb. Just pop the top of the airbox and spray it in while running. Make sure you use fuel stabilizer and do NOT store with reformulated fuel. It has a much shorter shelf-life, and it contains 10% ethanol (in most areas) which absorbs moisture from the air, and speeds up the deterioration of rubber components in your fuel system. Do not store an EFI sled with an empty or near empty tank. The fuel pump can get stuck and it won't want to start. Store it close to full, with just enough room for expansion. That's actually a good rule on any vehicle with a vented tank, because a partial tank allows condensation to build on the inside of the tank walls, and the water will run down and keep building up at the bottom of your tank during the off season.

As someone else also said, if you are going to start it every few weeks, make sure that you bring it up to normal operating temp before you shut it down.
 
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