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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I'm new here--from Upper Peninsula of Michigan, near Marquette.

We get a lot of powder, thanks to "lake effect" snow blowing in on north winds over lake superior. Over 300 inches of snowfall last year.

I ride often, mostly with my wife. I run a 2001 Yamaha MM 600, while she's got a '92 Phazer II Long track.

Although I hate to admit it, I occassionally get stuck. With the wife's sled, it's no big deal, as I'm around 6'4", 270# and still fairly young and healthy. As such, I can still throw that one around pretty well. But when I stick the Mountain Max, it's usually a whole different level of stuck, not to mention the serious weight that I have to deal with myself (she's a little thing, and not much help other than working the throttle while I push). There's been times where I simply had to leave the sled and ride out in tandem of the wife's, and find a couple of buddies to ride back in with me the next day to do an extraction. Man, do I hate that..

I've been searching for possible ways to to extract the sled without killing myself. I've seen the "self winching" system which winds a rope or strap around the track to allow the sled to pull itself forward. I've also found what appears to be a tall "jack", called the LEEVER system I believe. The other thing I've been considering is somehow rigging a ATV winch to to the sled to pull it out, but there's not a lot of substance on the front end that I'd feel comfy mounting something like that on...

Does anyone have any advice on these or anyother technique that takes the burden off of this miserable activity?
 

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Yooper, in my group, if you ain't gettin stuck, you ain't riden. I can't imagine leaving my sled because it was stuck.
. First thing to try, pack the snow back toward the track from under the bulk head with your foot, pack a path in front of sled for about ten feet or so by walking(good thing for wife to do), have wife give throttle while you pull on ski loop, once sled is on path you walked, get on it and give it heck.
. Carry a shovel with you to dig out with, in my group beacon, probe and shovel are standard equipment, the shovel is a fold up and only weighs about 2 pounds, it will mount on your clutch cover with spare belt. We all wear backpacks with our survival equipment
. If snow is to soft after packing and digging, eat lunch and wait a half hour or so, it will set up with a little time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for the advice. I may have come off like a "newbie" to the sport with that last post; actually I've been riding since '78, with the vast majority of it being on old ungroomed logging roads, in serious snow country--we can get up to 2 feet of fresh powder a week; last year the powder layer was chest deep when you stepped off of the machine.

Up until owning the Mountain Max, my sleds were light enough that I could usually lift either end to get it into some "fresh" powder and out of the trench. No more, though. My usuall method now is to get my shoulder onto the grab bar while my wife is on the throttle. I find that I can get more force to the sled this way rather than pulling on a ski. Packing a trail ahead helps; sometimes I take along snowshoes to do this, but that can be a pain.

Leaving a sled behind sucks, no doubt. Keep in mind that I'm not talking about an "oops, i dug the track in" incident. What I'm talking about is stuck by epic proportions, like putting one into a unfrozen creek bed burried by 6 feet of powder, with only your 115 lb wife along. Or bogged down in the middle of a lake in 3' of slush. Shy of some serious mechanical advantage, there aren't a whole lot of options.

I'll definately look into picking up one of the shovel/saw combos. I guess I was more interested in anyone's experience with the lifting/pulling contraptions though.
 

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last year was the 1st year i carried a shovel,i couldnt believe what a difference it made for getting a sled unstuck,even by yourself,simply dig out under your bulkhead and running boards and shovel a small path in front of the sled to get a run to get back on top,last year my buddy was stuck in slush(polaris 500 fuji.....crappy track 3/4 lug 121")and would have never got him out with the 2 of us without a shovel,we tipped the machine on its side and mixed the slush with fresh powder to get it nice a thick,and actually made the slush turn into a hard pack snow,then we made a 15 foot path in front the same way,that way the machine starts on a flat surface and can get a run at getting out,without the shovel we wouldnt have been able to pack all the fresh powder in the slush,the other thing which sounds good is the SNO-BUNJE device and the RATTLER,ive read some posts on them and nothing but positive feedback :D
 

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Same advice as above, carry a avalanche shovel, lightweight and a large scoop. We also have both of the SnoBunjes, the handheld one and the longer Cobra, they work great. We also carry about 100' of climbing rope and a racheting pulley for more difficult situations. We got the pulley from SnoBunje, but I have seen them in some Ace Hardware stores.

Check the SnoBunje website to see what the pulley looks like.

http://www.snobunje.com
 

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that thing does look cool. :p
 

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Welcome aboard Yooper


Most times when I get stuck(which isnt too often thank god) I have to rely on the members of Team Renegade to help get me out.But I can see in this coming season with the 136 I probobly will need more help as I will be going in the deep powder alot more :) :D



Last edited by LadyK at Oct 2 2002, 10:00 AM
 

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I heard nothing but positive info about that snobunje, I think I might get one this year since I sometimes ride alone or even when Im riding with my wife. 600lbs is alot of weight to move. I hope I can pick one up at the snowmobile show.
 

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Sno Bunji all the way. We use the double hook, it works best when you hook to the bumper of the pulling machine and the ski loop of the stuck one. We usually make a couple of tracks around the stuck machine to pack the snow, than hook up and pull untill the bunji is tight and than both hit the throttle at the same time.

Where's my friends
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Man, that snowbunje looks pretty cool.

I ordered 2 of them yesterday.

I am going to be getting braver this year now that I am putting a 136X1.25 track on the FZ.

I am probably going to need the thing.

I can get a 95 polaris 800 triple into the back of a full size pickup by myself.(It wasn't easy though)

But being only 5'4 its pretty tough lifting a sled out of the snow when the powder comes up to your armpits.

My company just signed an advertising deal with Fiskars.

They make some pretty cool carbon fibre shovels and one of their execs found out I was a snowmobiler and gave me one of their outdoor kits

Take a look at this thing, it looks pretty cool. The shovel is only 39 ounces.

http://www.gerberblades.com/gerberlegendar...ades.html?05638

I may be able to swing a deal on these kits so if you are interested let me know.

DP
 

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i like the concept of the folding shovel,i wonder how its works in the powder the blade doesnt look to wide?
 

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How much is the kit? Looks like it's worth it,good looking tools.
Caleb
 

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:p Hey bonzi, thats photo looks like a nasty stuck. It looks like your burried and into a uphill slope, it sucks trying to 180 turn a sled. Yooper , all the advice above is awsome. I too ride alot with my wife, she has 2000 mountain lite so hers aint to bad but i find if your climbing and get stuck on a vertical , just pack the snow on the left or right side from the ski tips down to about the middle of your sled and 9 out of 10 times if you grab the ski handle and crank, it just comes around so you can jump on and go. You just build a little step or ledge and it seems to work well for us. Now on a flat, especially if your breaking trail, like the above peple say, pack a track in front or have anyone else do some laps around you. And when you mentioned getting stuck in slush in the middle of the lake that brought back some bad flash backs of trying to get a 700 mountain max with 2'' track out of the slop with two polaris 156'' rocky mountains tied to each of his skiis and we had to go half a mile to shore, what a roost fest. P.S. dont forget its all fun on a sled even if your back is on fire the next day
 

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ive seen what happens when you pull a sled out of the slush with another sled,imagine 2 pulling and with 2 inch tracks :D that poor mountain max....nice rooster tail :D
 

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;) PANTERAONE, It was ugly. We were all in such a rush to get it out and were about 1 hour from the vehicles and in a new area to boot so we didnt cover the front of his machine so when we got it back to shore and popped the hood there was nothing but wet crap everywere. You could not even see a motor. Not to mention it was so deep in spots that all our boots were full as well. But i tell ya watching from the sidelines, those rocky mountains looked like JET BOATS
 

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regor ...had to tow a sled around 60 miles in slush and powder(the guy snapped his handle bars),but we taped up all the vents with duct tape,the sled had like 4 inchs thick of ice on the cab....hard as a rock..lol... good thing we had a heated garage at our destination to fix and thaw out for the ride back :D
 

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In addition to the other methods mentions I usually can pull the sled right over on it's side (37" stance, swaybar canned) and kick and stomp snow under it, rock the sled back over and go. What you don't want to do is to make your stucks worse. Learn to get off the throttle before you blow all the snow out from under you. I often actually feel the stuck coming, nail the throttle and jump off and throw the sled foward. You have to pick yourself and wade to the sled, but it's better than digging.



Last edited by Snow Monkey at Oct 14 2002, 02:45 PM
 

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My group does pretty much the same thing as omotm and hill pounder. As soon as I feel it starting to dig, I get off the throttle. Next I stomp a path in front of the machine and then stomp the snow right next to it. That way we lift the back of the sled onto the stomped snow, have someone pull the throttle and the other person pull on the ski and it comes right out. I found how not to get stuck:
1. don't stop going uphill. I always stop on a level (if you can find it) spot or facing downhill.
2. ride in groups if all possible. I never go into the back country without a cell phone and a partner.
3. have some idea of the terrain your getting into.
The rest you can forget, your going to get stuck. I did install a reverse Kit in my sled this summer. I got screwed up a lot last year trying to turn around in places I shouldn't have been. Where I live, there is nothing level (13 miles from Yosemite National Park). I went down a slope that turned out to be extremely steep. Thought my sled was doomed til spring, had to ride straight up out of a canyon between trees and stuff. that sled did it, it was hairy.
 

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Hillpounder I use that same crazy technique. When I feel a stuck comin on just nail the throttle and bail, lol. The sleds jumps on top. Just swim back over and off you go. :)

Yellosled that shovel looks nice. I like the lightweight part and a saw is a must have. LadyK bought me a SOS shovel last year for christmas. It has held up great so far. Used the saw a few times, super sharp :hallo4:

CrazyB straps an oscar shovel to the back of his sled. At night its great, makes for a monster brakelight, but during the day there is NO brakelight , don't follow B,lol


Here is a pic of the SOS shovel
 

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