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Ok Yammi guys and gals--if cooler fuel and air mixture equals denser fuel charge which equals more horsepower why on earth would you want to heat the carbs??? My assumption would be for de-icing due to the forced air induction--but if so, why is there an on/off dial for it? Are you guys leaving it on or running with it in the off position? Any help to clear this up would be great. ???
 

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I actually have a Ski-Doo right now and it also has heated carbs, it keeps them from iceing from the venturi effect. The valve is so you can turn it off when the ambient temp. gets high. My manual says off over 41 degrees F.
 

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the heated carbs are for when it gets very cold out to prevent icing in the carbs, or to melt ice in the carbs if it develops.

i don't ever use mine unless its about 0* F or less. otherwise it gets boggy.
 

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Take a air cooled vw beetle, disconnect the heat crossover from the exhaust, it heats up the intake manifold. drive in 32 degree and lower temps, watch the carburetor and intake manifold turn into a sno-cone!! Ive seen it. older carbureted honda cars will do the same thing if the flapper valve from the exhaust manifold is not connected. The Venturi from the cold air and the cold gasoline will form a snow-cone on top of the venturi, it will freeze up the venturi nozzle and starve the engine of gas. More carbs in extremely cold climates should have them, Mountain sleds came out first, I guess due to the higher elevation/lowertemps.
 

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yeah flat slides ice up easy. The performace goes down when they ice . Gas with water in it from those not so nice gas station. They help.
 
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