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I have a 98 FIII 600, and for one of my summer projects while servicing my clutches I may try changing my helix. I will give you my thoughts from the research I have done fron the Doo race manual, and from the net, I have never tuned a clutch before other than replacing stock parts and adjusting my TRA clickers so here goes........first, I am considering a "multi angle" it has a 50 degree in it stock. I trail ride, and occasionally me and the buddies line them up. I am looking for the best of both worlds......better acceleration especially with "cold" pipes, and equal or possibly a little better top end with a backshift that that is quicker out of the corners at Trail speeds. My sled has stock pipes, and silencer (I like it quiet) and I expect to be about 260 lbs with gear during sledding season. I was considering one of the 54-52-50-48 quad angle Helix's from Erlandson.....The steeper angles at the lower end should afford me a better holeshot with cold pipes because the RPM's are noticeably 2-400 lower than with good hot pipes......at "cruising speeds" the 50 degree area should be good and for those hard charging runs the 48 degree should give me good top end with a quicker backshift when I have to let up a little for those corners. are my theories sound? would I bet better off with a 52-50 or 52-48 2 angle? I know that it may require som playing to get the very best setup, but fundamentally do you tuning pro's find my ideas sound? It may not be the best setup possible, but will it improve these areas as I have explained? what effects will it have on the primary adjustments if any? any tips? P.S. I rarely reach top speed, but I do get it to wide open throttle and 80-90 alot.

Thanks for any input!
 

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One option you might want to try that does not cost much is a set of adjustable pins to add some weight for a faster shift out.A friend of mine has the same sled and it tends to over rev a bit so it could easily handle more weight.Either goodwin or ski-doo sells them at a reasonable price.There was a warranty bulletin on your primary spring,the stock spring should be violet/blue(160-290).As far as the helix goes a straight 50 is a good all round choice.I use one in my 800 twin and found it works the best for me.Make 1 change at a time and run it against a comparable machine to see if you are making any gains. Test Test Test..........................
 

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slarson, I would recommend that you simply try a 44 or 46 black ice helix from HRP motorsports and secondary clutch buttons from Goodwin performance (they are much cheaper than Bombardier teflon and give very quick backshift and last much longer than stock buttons), along with a Goodwin blue secondary spring (same twist tension as stock beige but a little more side pressure for less belt slippage) and set the secondary at 17-19 lbs. This setup with your stock primary setup will upshift quicker, backshift quicker out of corners and still allow you the same top end as before. Another thing I would recommend as you mention your a big boy, would be to gear down the top sprocket 1 tooth, to give a little more torque to the track. The reason I don't recommend a 54-48 (which probably would help acceleration) for trail riding is it causes more slippage of the belt and reduces efficiency on long trail rides.
Hope this helps !
 

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Slarson, all sleds are set up from the factory for 170# riders. Ask any good clutch tuner and they will say; For every 30#s you weigh over the 170 mark, gear down 1 on top, in your case, 3 would be the magic number.
I prefer steeper helix's like 50-47, 53-47, 53-50 and the like, never had good luck with the lower angles. Next crank the spring pressure on the secondary up to 24-27# breakaway, this elimates most belt slippage and has excellent back shift, also use a softer belt like for your sled an 066. Keep your stock beige spring because it is the best one for a skidoo, Goodwin blue and Cundey red are junk, been there done that [their now in a land fill]. If you over rev, add pin weight or adjust the clickers but try not to go over 3.
There are a million combonations to clutching and a million guys telling you different ways, all I know is this works on my 800 Flll and it rocks now with the above changes. GOOD LUCK!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies so far guys.......headgasket, mine does not overrev (yes I have checked the tach against a more accurate one) my biggest problem is low rpm's with cool pipes, once they are good and hot rpms are right on, the trick is keeping the pipes hot, cruising at 40 mph then getting on it does not get them hot enough.......Limskii, does HRP measure their Helixes the same as Doo? or are you actually recommending less Helix angle? and if so how does less angle give me a faster shift out? is it the coating on the helix and the tefelon buttons? I understand less angle with give me a quicker backshift, I definetly would like to keep efficiency in tact because I do alot of high mile per day rides, I am also considering gearing down one tooth any ways for a little more grunt....is it that less helix angle and a lower gear ratio will work in the direction I want it to?............Mikadoo, my first question is what do the goodwin blue and cudney red springs do for you not to like them? I am also cosidering gearing down, but I would go one tooth at a time to test. what I am trying to do is to tailor the sled more to my style and I am not trying to make it the fastest thing on the planet. What have you noticed the lower helix angles do compared to the ones you are recommending?

Thanks all for the replies and keep em coming!
 

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slarson, I did forget to mention that HRP measures helix different, and that they say add 4 degrees to their angle to equal bomb., along with 2 extra degrees for the coating. I personally just add 4 degrees, as most cams are coated now. I have and tried a bomb.(50-47, 50, 52, and 54-48) on my '97 Mach 1 with the stock pipes, and in side by side testing on packed snow with buddies, the 46 black ice was the best helix on my sled for drags and roll-ons. I, unlike Mikadoo, have had no problems with my Goodwin blue secondary spring in about 3000 miles (I will however replace it this winter). I also prefer to run secondary tensions at 20lbs. max. for trail riding, as I experienced high belt wear with higher tensions (belt top width narrows quickly). I do sometimes use 23-25 lbs. with the 54-48 if grass dragging with lots of pin weight. These are just my experiences, but as Mikadoo mentioned, there are countless combinations with clutching.
Hope this helps !
 

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Slarson, my experiences with both blue and red secondary springs have not been pleasant. I have found them to weak. Tryed low to high belt pressures with the same results, belt slippage=high temp's=blown belts, this can also lead to a damaged crank seal and big bucks and lost time getting the engine fixed. When I first bought them I thought they were nothing but skidoo beigh spg. same amount of spg. wrap-same height and same diameter but the tensel strength must be different? I have had excellent results with higher spg. breakaway's, my belts last longer and slippage is kept to a minium. The only draw back I have found is high wear on the nylon shoes[replace once a year].

As for helix's,the steeper the angle[higher number] the quicker the sled will upshift. Think of it as a steep hill, the steeper it is, the faster you get to the bottom, there is a certain point in there where you can upshift to fast and if your sled doesn't have enough power it will fall on it's face. It's a matter of finding the right combo. That's why a steep start and shallow end can give you the best of both world's!

As I mention earlier, sleds are set up for 170# riders, you said you weigh 260#. Another way to look at this is take a car with a manual tran's, go from point a to point b starting in second gear and record your time. Now do the same thing again but start in first gear, of course starting in first will get you there a little faster. Manufactures set up sleds for a [happy medium] it's up to you to customize it.
I figured this out years ago with this car I had that would do 160 MPH in 5th gear but not in 6th, same principle, but a sled has a tremendious amount of drag.

So gear down and go up [if you can on the helix] and your sled should really rock on and off the trail, in most cases it will even have more top end like the 5th-6 gear principal!

Good luck!
 
 
 
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