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as I have posted yesterday with the bed length and track distance allowed to hang off ...

I was wondering towing with types of trucks?

Always the brand faithful. "Ford/Dodge/Chevy"

Need some real information. no bashing or anything.
Only positive comments and information greatly appreciated.

How are midsize tucks. Canyon/Ranger/Dakota for towing 2 sleds.

What kind of truck do you have and how well does it do upnorth in the snow while towing 2 sleds..

thanks for the information
 

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i have an 01 dodge ram 2 wheel drive,it pulls great,i have the towing package on it,it has a 318 or the magnum engine.the gas mileage is really good. i had a chevy before this one and comparing the 2, i am so glad i bought the dodge this time around, no complaints at all!!!!!! this is a pic i took with the 98 cat i just bought for my daughter for 400 bucks. i didn't take the trailer as my sleds were on it lol. now this should answer your other question in the other post. my truck is a short box and that sled is a 136 track touring sled. the skies were touching the front of the box,i had a copp follow me for about 20 kms and he never bothered me at all. just make sure you strap it in and they can't really say to much.we brought the sled from parry sound ontario all the way to mitchell like that (almost 330 kms)with absolutly no problems at all.my other 2 sleds are in the avator they sit on my trailer,the cat sits in the box and away we go. i also moved a 35 ft travel trailer last weekend 430 kms with 0 problems,and with the stabilizer kit the truck dosn't even squat a bit.i got about 19 mpgallon pulling that,set the cruise at 110 kms and drove.that trailer was 8500 lbs according to the id tag. hope that helps a little
 

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i have an 01 dodge ram 2 wheel drive,it pulls great,i have the towing package on it,it has a 318 or the magnum engine.the gas mileage is really good. i had a chevy before this one and comparing the 2, i am so glad i bought the dodge this time around, no complaints at all!!!!!! this is a pic i took with the 98 cat i just bought for my daughter for 400 bucks. i didn't take the trailer as my sleds were on it lol. now this should answer your other question in the other post. my truck is a short box and that sled is a 136 track touring sled. the skies were touching the front of the box,i had a copp follow me for about 20 kms and he never bothered me at all. just make sure you strap it in and they can't really say to much.we brought the sled from parry sound ontario all the way to mitchell like that (almost 330 kms)with absolutly no problems at all.my other 2 sleds are in the avator they sit on my trailer,the cat sits in the box and away we go. i also moved a 35 ft travel trailer last weekend 430 kms with 0 problems,and with the stabilizer kit the truck dosn't even squat a bit.i got about 19 mpgallon pulling that,set the cruise at 110 kms and drove.that trailer was 8500 lbs according to the id tag. hope that helps a little[/b]

How does your 2wheel drive do in the snow up north?
I have had experience iwht 2wheel drive trucks and they are a huge pain in the arse in snow.
 

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When I have to trailer up the mountain on ice or packed snow, I have to use the 1984 F-250 7.5L 2WD with chains. It is pretty terrible, but not bad enough for me to buy a new rig. Of course the engine has all the power you want and it's geared perfectly, but even with all my crap that I keep in the bed, the weight of the canopy, and the tongue weight of the 2-up trailer (not much) the rear tires have terrible traction even with chains. The rear end constantly breaks loose going up the passes when there's any ice or packed snow. The slower you go the less likely it is to break loose, and since that engine has a ton of torque you can go as slow as you want in whatever gear. It's not fun to have to drive 30mph or less up the highway and still feeling a little nervous the whole time. It just seems like there's not enough weight on those rear wheels, and I know most pickups are traditionally that way. I've never had a problem with steering or braking, assuming you know how to drive a truck on snow that part of it works well, but keeping rear wheel traction during acceleration and maintaining speed on long hill climbs is the real problem. My advice would be if you go 2WD shop around and get the best chains you can find, really hardcore truck chains that also go on easy. Then whatever you can do to get more weight on the rear axle. Load the sleds more forward on the trailer if possible, you know, put firewood in the bed or something... Even with 4WD I would be scared to trailer on ice and snow without chains - you still have to be able to stop.
 

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well in ontario chains are not permited. as far as traction goes in snow with the trailer,i have to put weight in the box, usually 4 bags of salt or sand,and its pretty good.with the third sled in the box it will be even better. just make sure you have very agressive tread on your tires.i will say this with no weight in the box it isn't the best. but it is alot better then my chev was. and im not bashing chev im just talking with my own expeirience. when the time comes to replace my truck it will be another dodge, and before i bought this one i was a die hard chevy man and i was very leary on buying the dodge in the first place. but now i would never think twice about getting another one.just keep one thing in mind 4x4 = bigger fuel consumption,and if your on icy conditions it won't make that much of a difference, except it will put you in the ditch further,and your steering axle will spin as well which means your steering won't be steering but spinning instead lol. just my 2 cents,but unless you are planning on using it in the mud in the summer or plowing snow in the winter its not of that much use to ya.i know some will disagree with me but again that is my honest opinion from my own personal expeirience.
 

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2 thoughts -
Mid size trucks have plenty of power to pull a 2 place - but have a really bad time seeing around the sides of a covered trailer. The inlines work good, but are a huge sail in a cross wind. After a recent experience resulting in 2 nearly totalled sleds, and one very totalled R&R, won't be doing that again any time soon.

Do yourself a favor if you are going to be trailering - or even driving - regularly in nasty weather, get something with 4 wheel drive. I tried getting away with 2 wheel, and did OK for a while, but eventually found 2x4 was a pain in the butt/not worth the headache. If nothing else, the peace of mind having the 4x4 is worth it. It's saved my bacon on more than one occasion.
 

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We have a 97 gmc 1500 4x4 work great pulling our heavey skandics around in the snow up here in northern ont. You need to get a good set of tires that make a world of differnce, we have some toyo mud and snows on our truck.
 

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I have a 1995 Chev X cab short box with the 350 in it..It tows not too bad, the dam truck is a pig on gas especially when towing my sleds...I am looking into getting a new truck and from all the research, and most of my buddies have new trucks I will be going to the new Tundra. My buddy bought one a while back and the truck is very good on gas even when towing ( comparing to other trucks with the closest size engine.) Rides a little rough but he has the off road package...
 

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most of the time im driving 3/4 ton or 1 ton deisels but a half ton gas pickup of any brand can pull even a 4 place with ease as long as it have a v8 and on the v6. i like GMC and chevy but really they are all good for what you are doing
 

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I had a '94 K1500 w/ a 350 TBI (not the Vortec) & towed a couple of times w/ a 2 place trailer. No problems. One trip to New Liskeard I had my sled & a 2 place behind my 2000 K2500 w/ 6 L.

I'd go w/ a 4WD because you don't know how your traction will be in unplowed parking lots, cottage roads, etc. Bro almost had his K2500 w/ our 4 place behind it almost buried @ Lillabelle this winter.
 

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to just give you an idea of how easy the half ton can pull something. we have had a fully loaded 6 place trailer plus gear in the back a n4 people riding in a 98 half ton suburban with no problems. 5.7 liter 350 can pull alot
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Im trying to stay away from those big 5.7 litres
for gas purposes.. for the few times a year I pull a trailer Id rather have a smaller engine and pull a little harder then have terrible gas mileage all year round..

thats why I was looking at Dakota/Rangers/Canyons..

for a year or 2 ill just be putting my sled in the back of the bed anyways.. but eventually I wanna get a 2bed trailer and dont want to have to get another truck in a year to be able to pull the 2 bed..


I'd be getting 4x4 on it for sure.. Its just the matter of towing power..

what does a open 2 bed snowmobile trailer weigh anyways?
 

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sleds, there was sleds back there? :whistling:
 

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my cousin has a 4 banger ranger and he can pull his 16.5 foot crestliner with it. is say get a V^6 half ton or a V6 small pickup and it will pull no problem.
 

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The Dakotas work great. Like I said, what gets you in trouble is visibility to the rear - with a conventional 2 place enclosed anyway. For hauling machines in the bed of a truck you run into trouble with mid size and smaller too. You'll need to load the sled backwards (which works fine) or build som kinde of wheel well high platform for the front to sit on loaded forward. Distance between wheel wells too narrow to accomadate todays sleds.

2 place open can weigh 350 to maybe 600 or so (thinking of one of those tandem axle Floes).
 

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well i will tell ya right now, if your worried about gas mileage then you don't want a 4x4. my dad has a 2003 dodge dakota 4x4 with a v 6 in it and he gets worse gas mileage then i do with my full size v8 dodge 2 wheel drive. also if your only going to pull a trailer around 1 or 2 times a year then why waist your money on a 4x4. the biggest mistake people make in winter driving is thinking that with 4x4 on they can fly down the road they are sooooo wrong. i was a truck driver for 18 years and i seen more 4x4's in the ditch buried then 2 wheel drives. all that 4x4 is going to do is push you further in the ditch.a 2 wheel drive will doo ya just fine if the weather gets bad just slow down a little, you will just get there 10 minutes later, and to me thats better then hours later and a huge towing bill. but that is very true about width and smaller trucks. your gas mileage will be 10 times worse as the sled trailers,even a open one with a salt sheild will stick out so far from the sides of the truck, it will be like pulling an open sail behind you.
 

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I would go 4 by 4 I have seen guys stuck just when the snow softens up a bit on are camp road...If you don't have a pile of weight in the back of a 2 wheel drive you are going to spin a lot, depending on the conditions....But it all depends where you live and what you do..I tried the 2 wheel drive thing years ago and even with good tires it was a pain in the ###, up here if you do any type of ice fishing in the bush etc. you need 4 wheel drive....Sure I could see a v6 being harder on gas, smaller motor but doing more work all the time , that,s a big truck for a v6, plus 2 wheel drive trucks are geared alot different and that's where the big difference for gas milage comes to play.....
 

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i have had 2 wheel drive and will never go back with 4x4 you can go in deeper snow. been in the up and 2wd could not even get up the hill in to the motel. the big disadvantage with 2wd is the ground clearance
 

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sledman 92. your steering the kid in the wrong direction. if you go back and read everything the guy said he only plans on towing 1 maybe 2 times a year,the rest of the year he plans on using the thing to go back and forth to work, what the hell does he need a big 4x4 gas hog in southern ontario for. if he can't handle a 2 wheel drive in the snow 1 or 2 times a year maybe he shouldn't be towing a trailer in the first place. he said gas mileage is very important to him so don't ya think a 4x4 is a little overkill for the amount he will actually use it.also don't forget the roads down here are usually covered in wet snow,and what does wet snow do after its been driven on by a million cars,( IT TURNS TO PURE SOLID ICE ) i don't care what you try to tell me 4x4 does absolutly nothing for ya in sheet ice, actually a 2x4 won't do any better in those conditions,but a 4x4 he will also have 0 steering on the ICY roads down here. the roads up your way are a totally different kind of snow covered. i have driven over 2 million miles on all different kinds of climates,and yours is totally different then southern ontario.now if he plans on driving through the fields and mud all the time well now thats another story. but i am only going by what the guy said he was looking for.
 

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Sorry Team, I have to disagree. If we're talking pick up, even local driving here in the Detroit metro area is enhanced with 4x4. Those icy conditions days we run into occasionally, have spent a lot of time waiting through an entire light waiting for a small (thinking Ranger/S-10) 2x4 truck to make it through an intersection taking an entire light to do it. Even small inclines can be a near impossible wheel spinning experience without a head of steam - think how much of a run you get at anything in rush hour traffic. 4x4 can take a frightening experience and turn it into just another ride to/from work.

Now, we're talking about throwing in an occasional trip up north where it still snows (well usually). We get off the main drag a little into a motel or restaurant parking lot. You have a good weekend, and pick up 6-8 inches of snow while you're there. Just merging into traffic in front of the motel or restaurant can be a challenge without 4x4. Thinking also of the additional safety factor of not sitting there spinning in a driveway watching oncoming traffic approach (even when you think you've allowed for plenty of time to do this). You tell a 4x4 to go, and generally that's what happens - and even at the very least it happens much quicker than you might with identical conditions in a 2x4.

I'll give you the point regarding stopping distance, no problem. I'll give you that a level of driving maturity is required whith 4x4, but to believe I have no more control while in nasty conditions out on a highway with 4x4 is something I will not give. Many times I have been able to continue, yes at reduced speed, but none the less able to continue due to the 4x4. To believe that a 4x4 will break traction as easily in bad weather as a 2x4 is silly. Yes, there are those conditions where everyone is on a skating rink (freezing rain!) and all bets of any kind of traction are off. That's not normall though. There are many more times where the roads are snow covered, and traction is available with 4x4 where it is not with 2x4.

Gas milage - identical V-8 Dakotas, 2x4 vs. 4x4 is 1-3 mpg difference - in all conditions around town and at 80mph out on the highway - real numbers. So there is a price to pay, but the cofidence and peace of mind, in my opinion, offered by the 4x4 is just plain worth it - even in this area.
 
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