Snowmobile World banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Discussion Starter #5

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the link![/b]
When I spotted this site I thought to myself it would be a good way for many to brush up on or expand their knowledge about snowmobiling. As it goes it is only those people who take the sport seriously are the ones who gain anything out of this. :thumbsup: It might be a good idea to pin this as it is important to spread the message about safe snowmobiling!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
I didn't like the test.. The questions were too hard.. I did trick the wife pretty good though.. On the machinery section, where I knew she'd have trouble, they asked where the brake was .. She answered correctly but I chose a wrong answer so she'd hear the wrong answer buzzer.. I then told her the answer was "C" or whatever, that the brake is in the footwell on the left side... She immediately said "no it isn't it's on the handle bars" I told her that's the aux. brake, but the MAIN brake, the one she SHOULD be using is a foot pedal in the footwell.... Hehehehe, can't wait till we go riding again, she'll be looking for it all day
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,679 Posts
Some of the answers are pretty silly really. Do you really need to take the owners manual with you everywhere you go? I've managed to put 3800 miles on my sled without ever opening the owners manual.

Another thing. I do it myself, but is there a point to having an emergency kit carried on the sled? If you go through the ice, your emergency kit is not going to do you much good sitting on the bottom of the lake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
I don't have a studded track but have seriously considered it on BOTH sleds.. Seems like "safety" is ENHANCED with studs but we must realize this "quiz" is for the general public and I guess the general public never needs to brake on ice :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I think they discourage picks on your track in general. If you ride frozen lakes or ride in hilly areas than common sense would kick in and picks would be sensible. Areas with marginal snowfall would not require picks because after a bunch of sleds would tear through the snow and into ground underneath damaging farmers winter wheat and areas such as golf courses which in our area are popular for the trails to run across. As for your ice picks hanging around your neck - It was brought to my attention that they have covers protecting you from the picks and is the best spot to have them after you fall through the ice because it is the easiest spot to grab them from. So a lot in our sport comes down to a little know how and a lot of common sense.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top