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could i spray some kinda lube on my slides to make them last longer? i saw a can of teflon lube on my shelf and thought it could help
 

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even if that stuff worked all it would take would be 5 feet alongside of the road in some grit to scratch it off.
 

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There are some machines that just seem to eat slides, however, usually, as long as you run good quality plastic, they'll last plenty long. Grit probably is the biggest enemy of you slides (and track clips) - that and over heating.
 

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There are some machines that just seem to eat slides, however, usually, as long as you run good quality plastic, they'll last plenty long. Grit probably is the biggest enemy of you slides (and track clips) - that and over heating.[/b]
O.K. I'll ask the question....how long should Hy-fax last?
 

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Sliders can last a few years depending on the conditions that you ride in. If you are traveling fast down a bare lake then the sliders will not last very long. For me sliders last 4 - 5 years but I have been lucky the past few years to be able to sled on good trails.

Snowfun348
 

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Sliders can last a few years depending on the conditions that you ride in. If you are traveling fast down a bare lake then the sliders will not last very long. For me sliders last 4 - 5 years but I have been lucky the past few years to be able to sled on good trails.

Snowfun348[/b]
How many miles?
 

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I have put 6000 - 7000 miles on during that time. That has been on mostly good trails with adequate lubrication. I agree with Paul, that lubrication you spray on the hifax will be removed very soon after riding down the trail; save your money and buy good quality hifax.

Snowfun348.
 

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get some grahite sliders they are only $2-3 more then the regular ones
 

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I figure 3000 miles is reason for concern. Typically we get considerably more - like 5000 or so- and our conditions are often not ideal. Sand and grit are probably a big factor in shortening slider life - as well as wearing the clips. Whether you run them hot, though, will also affect the life both of your sliders as well as the track.

I believe I have seen a heating/cooling break-in procedure for slides in owner's manuals. It seems that ironing the softened plastic as it is cooled by good snow has some affect on the wear properties of the slide. I would be carefull about cruising down a road to softne them though. I would imagine that imbedding grit would be really counterproductive to what is desired.
 

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5-6000 miles on slides seems rediculously high, even if only in perfect snow conditions. Obviously it depends on the track length also but I would think 2500-3000 on a 121 track is good. On 136 and longer tracks they tend to eat slides on the front leading edge of the skid. I only got about 1200 miles out of the original slides on the Crossfire w/136 track. Granted there was some marginal snow conditions on a couple hundred miles of the 1200. You can replace slides for $25....the sled cost $8-10,000.... does it really matter if the slides last 1500 or 4000 miles? Lets put it in perspective...if you replace slides every 2000 miles thats a cost per mile of 1.25cents!!! The sleds itself depreciate more per mile than that..... Carbides run $60-70 and only in very good snow do they make it 2000 miles. What about gas and [email protected] 10 miles per gallon and $2.50 per gallon for gas and $30 per gallon for oil. Thats about $160 per 500 miles or .32 cents per mile. Slides are a very small cost when you look at the big picture.....don't fret it....just replace them when they need it!!!!!
 

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Slides wear vary greatly from sled to sled. On my current sled with the 1.75 x 136 I just plan on changing them out at the start of every season, around 2500 miles. Now my old short track sleds with the one inch lugs would go 5000 miles no problem. In fact my previous two shorties where sold with over 5000 miles and had the factory slides with lots of wear left.
 

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Another major contributor to slider wear is track tension. A tight track will wear out sliders very quickly. New sliders should be tempered when first riden to help maximise their life. Heatt he slides by riding on a hard surface and then cool them in soft snow, and repeat a few times.
 

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I don't care about the cost of the slides. I just like my slides to last long knowing that when they do, it isn't heat ruining them. Heat weakens the glass rods in the track and quickly shortens their life which is my only concern with short slide life. I suppose in sandy conditions there might be other factors.

I suppose even a new track every 6000 miles or so is cheap at $0.10 per mile compared to the machine at at least $0.50 per mile and gas at the same in our part of the world. The trouble is, at over a buck a turn, I start getting stingy with even the cheap parts on the rig.
 
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