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I get the Houghton Lake Resorter in my email and thought this article was interesting. Kinda long, but interesting.


Snowmobile deaths decline third straight season in ’01-’02
November 27, 2002

The number of fatalities from snowmobile accidents dropped for the third straight year in the ’01-02 season when 33 riders lost their lives. And, according to the Department of Natural Resources Season Report, the profile of victims, contributing conditions and hazardous actions remain similar to past years.
Who are most likely to have accidents? The DNR report shows the majority of accidents happened on public roads and the riders hit fixed objects while driving too fast and under the influence of drugs or alcohol. The drivers were between the ages of 20 and 30, with the average age 32, and the driver was a male in 30 of the 33 fatalities. The majority of accidents happened on Saturdays between the hours of 8-9 p.m. and 10-11 p.m., with five in each time period.
The visibility at the time of the accidents was reported as good in 12 instances and the temperatures were between 20 and 29 degrees in 13 accidents. Most fatal accidents (13) occurred in January and the riders were riding either 600 or 800 c.c. engine snowmachines (six fatalities in each engine category).
The most accidents occurred in the Crystal Falls District in the Upper Peninsula where eight fatalities occurred. There were six fatalities reported in both the Newberry and Cadillac Districts. Roscommon’s District recorded three deaths.
The trend of fatal accidents declined the third straight year last season, from 42 in the ’99-00season to 33 last season. The highest number of fatalities in the past 10 years was 48 during the ’95-96 season. The lowest number was the 93-94 season when there were 28 fatalities.
Fatalities in the Lower Peninsula decreased last season to 19, from 27 the previous season, and was tied for the second lowest total in the past 10 years.
Of the 13 fatalities on roads five resulted from illegal road operation and one that involved “fleeing police” as the special circumstance. Five were on plowed roads, two were on seasonal roads and one was on a private road. A third of the victims, 11, were riding groomed trails with one of those crashes on an icy trail that was closed after the end of the grooming season and the operator was traveling to go ice fishing.
Six people lost their lives on the frozen surface of lakes, three involved breaking through the ice.
Three victims were on private property and all three involved trespass.
In five of the crashes the victim fell or was thrown from the machine. Three collided with motor vehicles and one collided with another snowmobile. One death occurred after the driver struck a deer.
Speed too fast was listed as the hazardous action in 20 of the crashes followed by careless/negligent driving in four. One person died as a result of “speed too slow.” In 30 of the fatalities it was the driver that was killed and two were passengers. Ten fatalities occurred on “borrowed” machines and 18 were on “owned” machines.
Twenty-five of the fatalities were residents of Michigan, four from Wisconsin, two were Illinois residents and one victim each from Ohio and Minnesota.
By day of the week the majority, 11, were on Saturdays with seven on Sundays and six on Fridays. There were no deaths recorded on Tuesdays.
In 12 of the fatalities the visibility was reported as “good” and in seven it was reported “excellent.”
Snowmobile registrations have continued to increase with a 4% increase for 2002 over ’01. Last May the state had 393,598 registered snowmobiles and 295,341 with unexpired registrations. By county Oakland County has the highest registration of snowmobiles at 32,045 followed by Macomb with 23,834. The county with the fewest number of registered machines was Keweenaw, with 239.
While snowmobile registrations increased the sales of trail permits declined by 10% last season and was the lowest number sold since the 1997-98 season. Last season there were 243,087 permits sold, a decrease of 26,805.
Last year the state issued 6,417 snowmobile safety certificates, an increase of 5% from the previous year and also the first year with more than 6,000 certified.

©The Houghton Lake Resorter 2002
 

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Originally posted by YellowBelly@Nov 27 2002, 09:22 AM

The drivers were between the ages of 20 and 30, with the average age 32,
I'm pretty good at math, and I can't figure this one out. I don't believe this is possible.
 
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Don't ya get it, they have an overpaid politician there coming up with these averages.
 
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I wonder if they are looking at the snow falls and the amount of available weekends for people to go riding over the past 3 years too. Not much to ride on for a few years now.
 

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LOL
Yeah, I saw that too when I read it. Hopefully it was a misprint at the paper and not the actuall report.
The nickname for our paper "The Resorter" IS "The Distorter" :doh: :p
 

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Jeesh, I wonder how much fuel was in each of the sleds at time of impact, what was the average, what helmets were worn? Why type of injuries were sustained?

All of their numbers are making my head spin. I need to go to the shed and smell some 2 stroke smoke.
 

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Well, you can thank that slow season we had last for the low amount of deaths, snow was there one weekend but not the next.........
 

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Yellowbelly,

Thanks for posting the report, if nothing else it should remind us that we should excercise good judgement while riding. These machines are so much fun and so powerful that they can get us into trouble in the wink of an eye.

Let's keep bringing those accident numbers down and down.
 
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