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Discussion Starter #1
Gonna be changing the sliders and inspecting the idlers on my 2000 MXZ 700 and 98 FormulaZ 583. I did this last year on my old MXZ583 and remember it being a real pain in the A** to reinstall the skid.
Anyone got any tips on how to make this easier?
Thanks :(
 

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I bolt up the front arm first, then use a floor jack to raise the skid into the tunnel and pull the rear arm down to the skid with a rachet strap until the bolt holes line up. But I'm sure other have their way too. :)
 

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When I work on the rear skid, I remove the bolts on one side abd then lay the sled on it's side. Using pnuematic tools aids in this process. Remove remaining 2 bolts, and then remove skid. Just reverse the process when completed. A mechanic at Ski-Doo dealer told me it works great and it did.

just my .02

FZ700
 

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I remove and install them myself with only a minor stuggle - getting the skid back in and over the track lugs.

Once in the track, line up the front holes and put the bolts in. The back arm should now be too far back compared to the mounting holes. Line them up vertically by adjusting the rear bumper height (chainfall works best) and then tighten the rear track tension adjusters while watching the rear suspension arm. It will slowly line up as you tighten the track. Then the bolts go in no prob.
 

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Ahhh...welcome to the rear skid shuffle.

I agree with the methods above. I lower and raise the machine by taking a couple of Ancra tie-down straps and slinging them over the rafters in the garage and lifting by the bumper. (I don't have a chain hoist, even though I should). Compress the suspension and keep it tied down with a couple of zip ties or similar item. Slide the suspension in front first, get the rear idler wheel past the track lugs, and get the front bolts started. It also helps to looses the track a little before you take it out, since it will be a bit tighter with the new hyfax when you put it back in. You can then raise and lower the tunnel by the tie down straps.

Don't forget to grease the suspension and replace any bad bearings while it is out!
 

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We hang the rear of the sled with a chain fall or strap..... loosen the track adjusters all the way out, and take the two large rear outside idler wheels off.....you can then work it out over the lugs much easier....... Before going back in, stand on the skid on the garage floor compressing the suspension, and place a 5' cam lock tie down stap over it, and cinch it down tight. You now have a smaller package to work back in to the sled. once in, bolt the front first, you may have to back off the tension on the strap slightly to bring the rear mount up to the holes in the chassis. once it's in, remove the strap, put the rear outside idler wheels back on, and adjust it back up........ Regardless of your method its a tough job, but all these steps listed here and above can make it easier. thanks DooZ ;) ;)
 

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I got them out of both my sleds right now :( I'll let you know if i figure out any other tricks for gettin them back in as i never doo it the same way twice as i'm always trying to find an easier way but i haven't yet.
 

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i suspend the rear of the sled from a barn beam, the skidframe comes out easy if you have the track loose and then just take out the 4 bolts keeping it in.

when you reinstall the skidframe have the spring supports off, to do this you will have to take off one idler on each side of the skidframe. the springs will get in the way a little but not bad if you find a spot to put them. the skidframe will be easy to work with this way, just put it in and bolt the front bolts then put in the back bolts then install the spring supports with the springs in them and last the idler wheels.

this is the only easy way to install a skidframe otherwise you will fight with it, wack knuckles, fingers get bloody and worst of all you might scratch the sled. GOD helpp don't scratch the sled.

of cousre then tighten the track after all that. :nervous:
 

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The problem that I always have is to line up the front holes, seems the susp. is always backed-up so I take a piece of wood, preferably a broomstick, put it between the track and the rear idler and turn the track so the susp, squishes towards the front. The track rubber teeth's keep the stick from going out. Thats done when rear of sled is attached to a barn beam. I tried to squish the susp. with a strap but my 380 pounds springs don't agree with that method, neither does my arms ???
 

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And the most important thing: Practise Practise Practise ;) :p
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the tips guys, I will post how it goes this weekend.
 

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Lots of good tips guys. Another thing that can help is to remove the blocks on the slide rails that hold the suspension spring ends in. This makes the skid very easy to manipulate. Definately doo the front bolts first. A floor jack combined with a sled lift works best. I have contemplated taking the rear idlers off too as it would make it much easier. move the back then the front that helps alot. Also get a couple of buddies to come over.
 

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I've got my wife convinced it's a very difficult job to doo,so i can't be disturbed while re/re the skids and drinking beer with the boys ;) Shouldn't be any more than a case of beer to doo it :D
 

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I have taken mine suspension in and out many times and would highly recommend unbolting the torsion spring slider tube that bolts to the rail. It is a 10mm bolt and nut. Then rotate the long leg of the spring toward the back of the sled. This takes all of the rear spring tension away and you can move the rear upper shaft where you need to, to get the bolt holes to line up. Then to reassemble just rotate the spring leg back toward the front of the sled, slide the slider tube back over the spring and bolt it back onto the rail. You may need to take one of the outside idler wheels off to get access to the bolt and nut but I think it is worth it. Good luck.
 

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bluebyyou all this sounds fine maybe if your looking to replace the track. But what you are referring to is a snap job if you just unbolt your slides & line up the track openings at the very rear and with a little force and some WD40 sprayed on the rails you can remove them w/o removing the skid.
 

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Originally posted by andw1@Nov 5 2002, 04:38 PM
I bolt up the front arm first, then use a floor jack to raise the skid into the tunnel and pull the rear arm down to the skid with a rachet strap until the bolt holes line up. But I'm sure other have their way too. :)
We just did this last weekend on my partner's '98 MXZ, probably took us less that 1/2 hour; went pretty smooth.

Jacqui.
 

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I always re-install front bolts in first (using a 4X4 block of wood under front of track), raising and lowering rear of sled with a car jack or chain fall. I then use a turnbuckle to compress rear of suspension to facilitate lining up rear bolt holes, especially since I installed the ETS bars which have stiffened up rear suspension. See pics.
Hope this helps !
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Limskii,
Great way to compress the suspension! Thanks for the pics of it.
 

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All in all, pulling the skid and replacing it just plain sucks. The worst time I ever had changing hyfax was about two years ago, on a January trip. We had being riding late on day near minocqua, WI, and headed down the Bearskin trail towards Tomahawk. The low snow conditions on the Bearskin just ate through the slides. The next morning, I had to change them out to keep riding. Only problem was when we woke up, it was -26 degrees Farenheit outside, with a monster wind chill! I backed the sled up to the outdoor stairs and slung a couple of ties around the bumper. There was so much ice on the rear skid, it was nearly impossible to get it out. I had to put it in the shower and run water on it to thaw it out. Plus, no air tools means the problems of getting both bolts backed out without spinning the other side...

The only reason I did it myself, was there was a two day back log at the local dealer since so many people had the same problem. Man it was really bad... However, I finished it early and we still put on a 200+ miles that day. :p
 
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