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:) i have a 1977 yamaha 440 exciter that was given to me for free {cool ha} anyway what is the stock horsepower and top speed for this sled?
also my tach is not working, where can i look for the problem? ;)also what have you guys used to repair a crack in the front where the hood attaches to the body it has a split in the aluminum body by the hinge.
do you guys recommend anyplace i can find parts for this old timer?
thanks james o. :hallo1:
 

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not sure on horse probly 40, 50, top speed FAST 80 possibly Faster than you will want to go with the crappy brakes and handling BE CAREFUL!!! :0: :0:
 

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Great first sled!! All years 440 Exciters were leaps and bounds ahead of the rest for there time. HP is around 45 and top speed is about 80..Great handling for its year and very reliable engines with a good chassis..Have fun
 

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Your tach could be one of several problems; a bad tach (gauge), electrical problem, or oil pump problem. If you follow the tach cable from the gauge, you'll notice it enters the front of the oil pump. It's driven by gears through this pump. There should be two screws that hold the cable into this housing at the pump. You can trouble shoot if you can find another tach cable and gauge and change out the old for the new, one piece at a time to find your trouble spot. Most likely, it's something from the outside the pump. If it's inside the pump, I'd ignore it unless you're trying to restore it and get her lookin' like new.

I repaired my Exciter hood with normal fiberglass repair. Once dry, I sanded it down, repainted it and it looks like new. A split in the aluminum may require a bit of sheet metal work. Find a piece the approximate thickness of the belly pan material and place your repair on the inside so it's not that noticable. You may have to bend the sheet metal repair to fit the contours of the area you're repairing. Drill holes in your piece, place it over the part you're repairing and mark the holes onto the bellypan with a marker or punch. Drill those holes, place your piece on the repair, and rivet them from the outside so the rivets are flush with the outside, not the inside.

If your aluminum isn't that bad and is just split a bit, just make a drill stop at the end of the split so it doesn't extend any further.

I have a '79 EX440 that I took to the U.P. last year and put over 200 miles on in one day. The total last year was around 700. No suspension, but who cares. I had a blast and it never let me down. Those machines are bullet proof and extremely fast for their size.

Jon
 
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