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Discussion Starter #1
I went for a ride yesterday marking up fresh powder along a canoe trail system that covers several lakes in a row with one large lake that has cabins on it.  Being a week day, there wasn't anyone but myself and a couple ice fisherman I had passed out on the lakes.  Then I came upon a machine in the middle of the large lake with a helmet on it and a dusting of snow, but no riders to be found.  footprints lead off the sled to one of the public use cabins but no one was there either..   I followed the tracks to a bay a few miles away when I spotted someone jumping up and down waving thier arms!  These two kids were overdue by two days. Stranded when the belt broke on a sled they had borrowed. They only meant to be gone a couple hours, and instead spent a couple cold and hungry days huddled in a cabin with no heat.  The point is ...don't take anything for granted.  If you borrow a sled, make sure it has everything you need in case something happens like this.(spare belt, plugs,etc.)  Tell someone where your going and always bring a cell phone!
 

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wow....guess somebody's guardian angel was working with the assassan that day!  
 

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Those kids are very fortunate!  Did they come out with any sickness or frostbite?
 

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Those kids are lucky there was a cabin nearby. It must get real cold up there.  I take it you had three on for the ride out. Been there done that lots of fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The kids were healthy enough, just tired and scared.  Although the boys feet were wet from walking around the lake in overflow.  He said they were "stinging" which is a good sign.  They gave me the phone number of the boys mother. My phone didn't work on the lake so I raced back down the trail (cell service was spotty at best) to call her and let her know they were found.  After repeating myself many times (she was understandably upset) we were able to coordinate a rescue with the troopers and the park service.  I was on a single seat machine and could take them out one by one if need be but I figured the park service was close, and maybe we can get them all at once.  So I waited for them at a spot on the trail.  A group of 3 riders came by and when I told them the story they said they couldn't get involved if there was going to be cops!  Can you believe that!  Another group of 4 came by later as I sat waiting and offered to help but I said I was waiting for the rangers.  They rode around for some time and came back by to see me still sitting there.  I told them "forget the rangers" lets go get the kids and maybe we'll run into the rescue party on the way out.  They had two 2-up machines and I ran and got the kids from the cabin and took them across the lake because my sled has a 151"track and 140 hp overflow wasn't as much a problem.  Do you know we never saw the rescue party that was supposed to be "on thier way"....  Thanks to those folks we got them back to my truck and I took them home.  I called the troopers to tell them don't worry the kids are home and she said she would pass the word.  I still can't figure out what happened there... The trooper told me to wait for them because they were quote"at the trail head and ready to roll".  Thers only one trail, so someone dropped the ball somewhere along the line.  Anyway, be sure you all have the essentials before going on that quick after supper ride!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oh yeah, as for the weather.... Like my wife said "they were very lucky it wasn't 20 below".  We had a low pressure system move over the area keeping temps about 28f to 30f above or this story would not have ended so well I'm sure.  
 

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Good job alaskanassan
It's people like yourself who help boost the name of our sport.I myself try to stop and help others in need as well because hopefully someone will help me if i'm in a bind.
 

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Those boys had someone watchin over them, thats for sure. Excellant job!!!
 
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Guy's but I'm no hero.  I'm just the guy that spotted them.  It could have been anybody...well, except for those idiots who were afraid of running into the cops!
 But thanks just the same.
 

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I am new to snowmobiling and there are not too many lakes where I ride in NY.  My question is what is overflow? Water on top of the ice?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The weight of the snow pushing on the ice forces water up through the cracks onto the surface causing water to collect under the snow layer and on top of the ice.  Because this water is insulated from the air, it seldom freezes.  The ice may be several feet thick and still safe, but slushy conditions bog machines down and often get them stuck.  I've been wadeing up to my knees in overflow trying to get free in below zero temperatures on more than one trip I hate to admit.  But in Alaska its all too common.
When I ride I always have dry socks along for just this reason!
 

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Alaskanassasan gave you a very good description of lake overflow. It can also happen on rivers and  may be caused in the same way. On rivers it can also with occur with little snow when the volume of water is too great for the space beneath the ice and the ice (which is often much smaller in area than a lake) can't/won't give enough to float or is frozen in places to the bottom so it doesn't have enough give to allow an increased water volume to pass. Overflow is also common on the ocean but occurs only at the point where ice meets some part of terra firma. Often the ice, though several feet thick, is frozen to the bottom (which is also often frozen several more feet down) which prevents the ice from floating at that point. This situation creates a "trough" along the shore into which tidal water is periodically flooded. When there is snow, the trough is then full of slush. Overflow under snow is often invisible and it is possible to be hundreds of yards out into it before realizing it. It pays to stayed tuned in to any changes in engine 'effort', changes in speed, or the 'feel' of the track and skis against the snow when riding over ice. Looking back at your trail is also not a bad idea as you may be able to take the necessary steps to prevent becoming stuck way into it. A track with more than a standard (3/4") trail lug is also advantageous as are a few studs. (It's a rather lonely helpless feeling to be in just a few inches of powder and slush on a machine that can turn the track freely against the absolutely tractionless water covered ice not being able to move for lack of a handful of studs to claw with and push the skis forward through the heavy mush - been there done that&#33
 

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......yeah, and also carry a reliable firestarter, VHF, etc...oh, and remember where the last high spot was in case you need to use the radio. (Hey, cell phones don't work in most of Alaska.)
 
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