Snowmobile World banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
To All:

Attached is NYSSA's position on the 'No Material Increase' proposed by the APA on setting and enforcing a mileage cap on the Adirondack Park. Please read and send in letters in your own words to the APA at the address listed. NYSSA understands the mileage cap, but disagrees with the current thinking the APA is using. Without your help, this will pe passed by the APA and trails will close.

No Material Increase
Talking Points

NYSDEC is proposing using the existing mileage cap of 848.88 miles as the ceiling for establishing “No Material Increase” (NMI). Any trail mileage that exceeds the 848.88 mileage cap will be considered a material increase (to date no policy has been issued to address material increase). To view the NYSDEC presentation to the APA; go to this link: http://www.apa.state.ny.us/press/slideshow/text.htm
There are two guidelines within the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan (APSLMP) that deal with NMI and they are
• Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan’s Wild Forest Basic Guideline #4: “Public use of motor vehicles will not be encouraged and there will not be any material increase in the mileage of roads and snowmobile trails open to motorized use by the public in wild forest areas that conformed to the master plan at the time of its original adoption in 1972.”
• Roads, jeep trails and state truck trails Guideline #3 as it pertains to snowmobiling: Established roads or snowmobile trails in newly acquired state lands classified as wild forest may be kept open to the public, subject to Basic Guideline #4....provided such use is compatible with the wild forest character of the area.
DEC is interpreting these guidelines in such a way that any snowmobile trails that exist on newly acquired lands will count toward the mileage cap. For example let’s say there are 805 miles of snowmobile trail within the Forest Preserve, DEC purchases land that has 70 miles of snowmobile trail making the total snowmobile trail mileage on Forest Preserve 875 miles; 26.12 miles would be considered a material increase and would have to be removed from the system. This is unacceptable.
The New York State Snowmobile Association is asking its members to write individual letters before the March 4th deadline to the:
Adirondack Park Agency
PO Box 99
Ray Brook NY 12977

NYSSA also recommends club president’s write letters on club letterhead explaining your position, please include the number of members you represent.

These are the issues that NYSSA feels you should include in your letter:
• Land Acquisitions-The Adirondack Snowmobile Plan recommends that whenever possible trails be located on private land. With the state purchasing large tracts of land we feel that eventually all large tracts of land may be owned by NYS thereby making this recommendation moot. On October 19, 2007 NYSDEC Commissioner stated the cap was not a hard cap and not accurate. He suggested that any trails on lands acquired by NYS after 1972 should be added to the cap. Therefore NYSSA recommends all trail mileage located on private lands at the time of purchase to NYS be added to the mileage cap ceiling. For example the mileage cap is now 848.88, if NYS purchases a parcel with 30 miles of existing snowmobile trail the cap ceiling should be raised to 878.88.

• At the February 7, 2008 APA meeting, DEC stated that both APA and DEC staffs completed an inventory of trail mileage they believed to be available in 1972 and both DEC and APA came up with the mileage figure of 740 (using different methods) available in 1972. Today the total trail mileage on Forest Preserve (including motor vehicle roads) is 766 miles. DEC is suggesting that as various UMP’s are completed with many having trails closed it will be a considerable time before we approach the 848.88 ceiling. NYSSA is concerned as to how this policy will affect future generations of snowmobilers. NYSSA is concerned that important trails will be closed just to avoid reaching the mileage cap ceiling.

• In addition to new land acquisitions another factor that may increase trail mileage is environmental issues. For instance the Adirondack Snowmobile Plan recommends we avoid wetlands, steep slopes and other sensitive areas. This may result in a rerouting of trail which could potentially add mileage. The Adirondack Snowmobile Plan also recommends rerouting trails to the periphery of particular units that more than likely will add mileage. Another issue is safety; again the Adirondack Snowmobile Plan recommends that trails not end at a lake and that they be rerouted to go around the lake, which will result in more mileage being added. NYSSA recommends that any additional mileage added to the snowmobile trail system because of Environmental or Safety concerns should result in the mileage cap ceiling being increased.

• Any snowmobile trails that are currently on Motor Vehicle Roads open to the public should not be counted toward the cap as these roads are open to motor vehicles in the non-winter months. An example of this would be the Moose River Plains Recreation Area. NYSSA’s interpretation of State Truck Trails #3 is any snowmobile trails on acquired parcels will be added to the ceiling. This should also include any snowmobile trails that are not on motor vehicle roads. NYSSA recommends that snowmobile trails on motor vehicle roads not count toward the mileage cap ceiling.

• NYSSA suggests a solution to future land acquisitions. In the past NYSSA has supported the state in purchasing easements as they have added permanence to our snowmobile trail system. There is a concern that the easements are a first step toward the state owning these lands in fee, thereby any snowmobile trails on these properties would suddenly count toward the mileage cap. NYSSA recommends that all future easements or purchases include language that will convey snowmobile trails to municipalities on newly acquired acquisitions.

You may want to include the economic benefits of snowmobiling whether it is anecdotal or if you have hard facts. Tell the APA, the only reason many businesses stay open in the Adirondacks is because of snowmobiling. Describe how you enjoy riding through the Adirondacks admiring the fabulous views and witnessing wildlife.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Nothing says you can't write in too-the more letters the better.......as we have done for Yellowstone, Grand Teton and numerous other out of state calls for help.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top