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hi I am getting ready to resrping my clutches and I noticed that there are notch setting ( 1 - 5) on the side of the secondary, I was wondering what these setting are for ( 1 is best for... 5 is best for... ect)
also, how big of a task is it to take the secondary apart and are any specail tools required?

thank you
 

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the 1-5 are to set belt hight. there are 3 bolts there there you can loosen and turn the brass piece and then tighten to set the hight. 5 is the lowest 1 is the highest. tells you how much belt life you have left to. with a 1 you have about nothing left. you need a clutch comresstion tool to take the secondary about. a 6 inch wide vice can also work but i would not recommend it.
 

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Josh, The secondary may be easy to difficult to take apart depending on whether the helix is free to slide or not. I live in a coastal area where I presume the salt air must cause parts to become frozen. Perhaps it is different where you live. In either case, if that clutch has never been apart I would think you may find that the aluminum helix will have become stuck to the hollow steel shaft of the outer sheave. Often what I do is to lay the clutch outer face down on the floor or table and twist the sheaves in opposite directions to take the sheave sliders off the helix ramps (inside.) Then I either hold the two sheaves in one hand - if you have strong enough hands- or hold them with my hands and press against the helix with my foot. You should be able to see if the helix will slide easily.

The two parts fit together rather closely, they are made of dissimilar metals, and there is a keyway involved. The combination usually results in them be difficult to move. Normally I soak the area around the snap ring with AeroKroil for a day to two before attemting to take them apart. That, of course, is what our conditions require. Your's may not. Then, I twist the sheaves opposite each other, hold both with one hand in tension, and tap on the helix with a heavy plastic mallet to get it to slide down. Next, I use a heavy duty snap ring tool and remove the snap ring and washer behind it. (Safety glasses a good idea.) (You don't have to keep the sheaves in tension when you do this if the helix doesn't slide easily.) I then grab the sheaves again and twist and release a bit just enough to "bump" the slider buttons against the helix ramps and, in that way, tap the helix off. If it doesn't budge I sometimes use 400 silicon carbide paper to polish the exposed portion of the shaft to help it move. I have never seen a helix move easily, but there is enough spring tension that, if it does, it might easily come off with significant force so be careful. Once you get inside the clutch you can clean out any dust and residue and inspect the helix ramps and slider buttons. It is probably a good idea to consider replacing the ring bearing ib the inner sheave, the one which slides against the outer surface of the helix. They don't cost but a few dollars, are easy to remove (remove screws and tap out), and prevent damage to the helix.

Make sure to replace the snap ring with the rounded edges inward, the square edges out to help it bite the groove better.
 
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