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You do not NEED to use it, but I wouldn't use anything other than premium. It is recommended. Using regular will primarily reduce performance only, but using nothing but regular all the time will leed to more engine "maintenance" if ya know what I mean ;)
 

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You do not NEED to use it, but I wouldn't use anything other than premium. It is recommended. Using regular will primarily reduce performance only, but using nothing but regular all the time will leed to more engine "maintenance" if ya know what I mean ;)[/b]
Thanks the reason I ask is, sometimes you can't get the good stuff and I would hate to get in that situation on a trail gas station at any point. Ill use the good stuff when available.

Petro
 

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always use prem. i say. better preformance, sled runs cooler, less possible to break (engine at least) and it is just all around better for seals, gaskets and so on. also better for VES, does get gummed up as fast, cleaner fuel. well atleast if you are in the middle of nowhere with only reg. you can run it. if i run reg ill blow up, stupid fun mod motors
 

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If you think you'll have to burn regular, you can bring a small bottle of Octane Enhancer to help condition the fuel and bring it up to the premium level. Not the same, but better than just burning regular.
 

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Chances are your sled is going to run better on regular gas. The 07's just seem to run better on regular. Not to mention better gas milage along with the lower fuel price. My sled also ran cleaner because the premium was dumping more in the pipe.
 

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I can not beleve that reg runs cleaner then prem any time I don,t care what it,s running. Prem will always run hotter then reg so how can it dump exc gas in the pipe?
 

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This question usually gets interesting.

Ever consider that maybe Polaris might recommend premium for the same reason they jet the carbed sleds rich from the factory?

If premium burns so much cleaner, and I can get a season or 2 out of a set of plugs running regular without any trouble, how long do you think they might last if I ran premium?

If my sled will run over 100 mph on regular, how much faster do you think it would go on premium?

With the gas companies making billions, why in the name of God would you even consider giving them more money than you absolutely have to? Do you send a tip alng when paying your electric bill?

With the vast majority of fuel being sold by most all stations today being regular, how fresh do you believe the gas you are paying top dollar for is?

Assuming for just a second that your sled was actually faster while running premium, when was the last time you won a race due to all the extra power?

So by now you've probably guessed my sleds never have, and likely never will, see premium (unless I'm on empty and it's the ony fuel avail.).

Flame suit on...... :D
 

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Lower octane fuel burns "faster", consequently hotter. Premium may or may not be cleaner. It takes more additives to make it premium (which reduces the combustability) so that might suggest slightly more deposits, if anything. Some engines which have a higher compression ratio and create a situation by their design whereby the fuel has a tendency to burn more easily, benefit from fuel which won't ignite too easily which can translate to too early. If an engine is not so designed, I don't see what possible benefit there might be except for loss of power overall or unless one was maxing the engine out speed or loadwise for extended continuous periods. Pay more for cleaner fuel if you like. It makes no sense to pay for something which provides absolutely no benefit however.
 

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I can not beleve that reg runs cleaner then prem any time I don,t care what it,s running. Prem will always run hotter then reg so how can it dump exc gas in the pipe?[/b]

You obviously do NOT understand OCTANE

the higher the # the COOLER the burn

This subjects make me laugh everytime someone says something ignorant

I was going to respond after the 1st reply but refrain to do so

as I was not sure if the sled in question was recommended FROM the FACTORY to run 87oct or 91

But as always you will get the ignorant statements aka premium burns cleaner,premium is hotter etc etc etc....................

Point being if the sled is made by the factory to burn 87oct burn 87 oct anything higher is a waste of $$$$

BUT if it says run 91oct by all means run 91
 

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I gave my answer based on what I know: Polaris engines are designed to burn premium gas. That's why I recommended it. Any engine that's designed for 91 octane can burn 87 octane and vise-versa, but if it's designed for premium, you're better off burning premium. Polaris sleds are designed for premium; burn premium. I've mentioned many times before that the Fusion does not like regular, will not run properly with regular, runs great with premium. Regular gas in the Fusion results in the same as adding water to the tank, which is not good.

Premium also allows the engine to run cooler, as it ignites faster. Possibly why Polaris has their sleds set up for premium, not for emissions or performance at all, simply to help prevent over-heating issues. But I do know first hand that the Fusion is picky enough to notice a big difference when not burning premium, or getting a bad shot of gas. The gas cap says: "Premium Recommended" and so does the manual. Do what the manual says.

Also, here, with the store coupons (cash back for the store) and the Esso points and VISA points I collect, premium gas here costs me 3 cents cheaper than regular. Yes, it is CHEAPER for me to burn SUPREME than it is to burn REGULAR. Sometimes I wish my car would burn SUPREME for this reason, but it's designed for regular, so I put regular in it. I HAVE noticed a decrease in performance from my car when burning supreme. The same decrease in performance when burning regular in my Polaris snowmobile.

It has nothing to do with how "fresh" it is. In fact, premium typically is not as fresh as regular, because less people buy it. But if your engine requires it, you have no choice. And if you're like me and it's cheaper to buy supreme than regular, they why not burn supreme to save yourself some money??? It's not about making the sled run faster, it's about extending the life of your engine and burning what the manufacturer designed it to run on.
 

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You obviously do NOT understand OCTANE

the higher the # the COOLER the burn

This subjects make me laugh everytime someone says something ignorant

I was going to respond after the 1st reply but refrain to do so

as I was not sure if the sled in question was recommended FROM the FACTORY to run 87oct or 91

But as always you will get the ignorant statements aka premium burns cleaner,premium is hotter etc etc etc....................

Point being if the sled is made by the factory to burn 87oct burn 87 oct anything higher is a waste of $$$$

BUT if it says run 91oct by all means run 91[/b]
Great answer! :) You're info is what I assumed everyone on the forum knew already, hence the short post I first gave simply suggesting premium as that's what his engine is designed to burn. :)

Part of how to determine how your engine will behave with different grades of fuel is: bore vs stroke. If your sled is designed for higher octane, chances are it will have a shorter stroke, or a stroke almost equal to its bore. Why? Because the higher the octane, the quicker it ignites. If you have too long a stroke, it ignites before the pistons have a chance to complete a full stroke, and you end up having them "fight" with one another, reducing performance. Which is why if your machine is designed for regular, you should NEVER burn supreme, because it can cause damage in the long rung. Typically, if you have an engine designed to burn premium, burning regular will result in a "partial flooding" effect, where there's not enough room in the chamber to get the proper air/fuel mix to ignite at the corresponding time for what the engine is most efficient. The 600's are a the worst example... they're right in the bloody middle of all this. Some cannot burn premium because it WILL reduce performance and gas mileage. But with a few mods... now it WON'T burn regular and you need to burn supreme.

I'm not saying bore vs stroke is the only factor here, but it is something to consider. The 900 is almost a perfect square (83 80)... so it becomes obvious that it IS designed for premium gas, there's no other way around it. Aside from this extreme, the only real way to tell is to check your owners manual. :)

Burning premium in an engine designed for regular is like putting gasoline in a diesel engine, just not as extreme. Burning regular in an engine designed for premium is the same as putting diesel in a gasoline powered engine, again simply not as extreme.
 

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My plugs last all year un less I,am out a trail and can only get reg and then I will ad gas ads. I run mid grade 91 and have never had a motor or a carb problem on all of the 25 or so sleds I,ve owned!
 

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Check it out, no matter where you end up, you'll see there is absolutely no benefit to running 91 in an engine designed for 87. Period.

As far as Polaris recommending 91, it's debatable if that really is required for most of us. It's kinda like them recommending VES II for oil. Many would debate the wisdom of running that too.

My experience (36 years riding, the last 20 on the highest performance Polaris sleds available) would indicate that no, 91 is not normally required. I'll qualify that by saying I ride trail, and could care less how far/how fast my sled will go at wide open throttle. My engines are never pushed that hard for any length of time. The reason for that is if they don't have enough power available to do what I ask of them easily - I get a bigger one.

My best guess is the reason Polaris recommends premium is to keep warranty costs down and reliability up. If they didn't recommend 91, and they sold a sled to a rider where WOT performance was important, or to somebody contantly demanding 100% of the performance available, then maybe there would be an issue. But that issue would more than likely be due to an overheated or lean motor - and that's where the 91 may help out (just like fat jetting might). Most of us that have been around a while have heard that rattling just before it gets real quiet up front and the headlight goes out........ The 91 might delay that just enough to avoid that.

With the detonation sensors on the newer motors, it's a moot point. The sensor will retard (or stop advancing) the timing when it detects rattling. This deto/rattling could be from a lean condition, or the result of overheating. In either case, it'll try to protect the motor using the timing. Here, to get 100% of the timing curve available (if you are looking for that last 5% of the available power), you may need the 91...... I'm pretty sure that 5% would likely never be noticed on the trail, no matter how good you are.

The bottom line is never going to change. Run what you like. I write all this because of a pet peeve regarding the gas companies raping the public unnecessarily. -Al
 

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I gave my answer based on what I know: Polaris engines are designed to burn premium gas. That's why I recommended it. Any engine that's designed for 91 octane can burn 87 octane and vise-versa, but if it's designed for premium, you're better off burning premium. Polaris sleds are designed for premium; burn premium. I've mentioned many times before that the Fusion does not like regular, will not run properly with regular, runs great with premium. Regular gas in the Fusion results in the same as adding water to the tank, which is not good.

Premium also allows the engine to run cooler, as it ignites faster. ...............[/b]

Some engines are designed to run on premium. If an engine is designed to run only on the higher octane which premium has, running lower octane fuel is not okay. It is quite possible for such an engine to begin to run like a diesel, not requiring a spark for ignition, but simply igniting due to compression. That is detonation which, with gasoline, is not a very very controlled burn. Since it starts before the spark normally does, it also "fights" the pistons' movement in the last few mm of upstroke. This creates more heat, not less, in the engine.

On the other hand, and engine which is designed for 87 (lower) octane, can run premium, but no benefit will result and perhaps there might even be a loss of performance since the engine will likely be a lower compression type engine to not benefitting from higher octanes.

Don't be confused by what is recommended and what is required. The company which warranties a machine is likely to be conservative in their recommendations. Alaska is a huge place with a variety of climates and elevations depending on area. It is typical for the better dealers in Alaska to ship a machine to a given place jetted for the worst case scenario for that area. So a machine might be jetted for -40 F at sea level even though you always ride that machine at 5000 feet and only in the spring when it's above 0 F. The dealer's recommendation for the area is different (more conservative) than what is required. It's a safer deal for them.

In the same way Polaris recommends using only Polaris oil in their engines. 50-something thousand miles on the Polaris and Arctic Cat machines in the yard which have run nothing but Citgo oil 95% of the time suggests to me that there is nothing special about Polaris (or 'Cat oil) which is not also found in other oils of equal specification. Would I have been better off running synthetic or the factory brand? I don't know. I hardly think so. I do know I would have paid more.

I guess the bottom line is this: if in doubt, spend your money (the companies raping- uh, raking it in will thank you). Then again being informed is an even better thing.

Ignorance might be bliss. I also contend it comes with a price tag. (Don't take that as an indictment, it's more of a personal philosophy.)
 

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Check it out, no matter where you end up, you'll see there is absolutely no benefit to running 91 in an engine designed for 87. Period.[/b]
This is my point exactly. Read me words more carefully, man, lol. If it's designed for 87, don't run 91. If it's designed for 91, don't run 87. I do realize that Polaris does not require 91, but recommends it. In that case, I run what I know my machine runs best. When I tried burning 87 in my Fusion (just the one time) it did not run well at all, and regardless of what the computer is supposed to do to adjust the timing, it still did not behave properly. I'm talking it wouldn't idle as well, wouldn't warm up properly, and wouldn't even pull out of the driveway without sputtering. Was half decent when giving it a large amount of throttle though. I have never experienced this with 91, so I always stick with 91. Not all machines are this picky though, but I do get good mileage... I also have no idea if this has anything to do with the octane level I'm burning or not.

So the best thing to do if it's not "required" but however is "recommended" then try both and see what's best. But even you have said that if it's "recommended" then there is a reason for that... even if it extends your engine life little, every bit helps doesn't it? Especially when people like me spend less for 91 than they do 87 in the first place AND it extends the engine life.

I'm a huge Suzuki fan when it comes to motorcycles. Has anyone seen the labels on the tank? "Use 91 Octane ONLY". A situation where you MUST burn 91 and never burn 87.

As for the oil, it's a matter of what you prefer. The only benefit Polaris claims to VES Gold II is that it helps protect your valves from needing to be cleaned as often... by perhaps 300 miles. Which is not that big of a deal if you're like me and bring it in every 1,000 miles for servicing anyway :crazy: But if that's what people want to burn (that's what I burn; I won't be blamed for any issues that may arise with my machine) than you can't complain; it's their choice.

So if it's only "recommended" and not "required" then start experimenting :)
 

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Man o man, I'll make this real simple, so simple even a 20 year old might be able to comprehend. Premium, or higher octane fuel has additives that will allow a proper burn under harsh (harsher, if that's a word) conditions, which would be higher heat, and higher compression. Engineers learned a long time ago that if compression is raised, power output increases. The problem was ( is) that under these conditions low octane gas explodes, or the more used word is detonation. Trust me on this, detonation is bad. When a spark ignites a proper gas/air mix, what is wanted is a rapidly expanding flame front, NOT AN EXPLOSION.

Premium fuel allows a manufacturer or tuner to increase compression, which in turn gives higher engine output. Premium does not have any extra power over regular, does not ignite faster, does not burn cleaner, does not make you run faster and jump higher ( oh wait, that's Red Ball Jets ). Timing, bore, and piston speed also also figure into this, but for this discuusion, that's way too complicated.

As mentioned earlier, if you use 93 octane in a 87 octane recommended engine, you are just sending more money to the oil companies. Polaris, and others, allow owners to use 93 in an engine designed for 93 octane to get the absolute best performance, or with a switch or detonation sensor/dual ignition curve, allow you to use 87 octane without fear of damage.

So, in answer to the origianl question, yes you can use 87 octane in your Dragon 700, as it has a detonation sensor and a smart ignition, that when it senses detonation, will retard the ignition timing, allowing the safe use of lower octane fuel along with a slight decrease in performance.

Next myth. :undercover:
 

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That means it is a cleaner fuel no changing jets on the trail no plug changes no piston changes just because you where trying to save a few pennys at the pump. As you penny savers at the gas pump are working on your sleds you know at the heated sheds they have for gas savers at the motels up north the rest of us, use good gas ! I even run prem in the truck to pull my sleds.
 
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