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I've put alot of miles on in the last two days, and I was having a very infrequent issue, when I went to slow down, the sled would almost die/stall. It happened a few times, I looked things over seemed fine.


Today I was riding and hit a rough section of trail so I was going rather slow for a while, and my sled stalled. I went to pull it over and the sled was jumping forward while pulling. So I checked over the primary clutch and the plates were tight on the belt. So i took the belt off, started it up, revved it up a little, and then I could see the clutch come in and then back out and snag at a spot. I did that a few times and you could see that it was getting stuck disengaging about 1/2 of an inch from 'rest' position. I got back on the lake and it was fine, seems to only happen once in a while.

Has anyone seen that? Is it most likely a rough or rusted spot at that position or is there some plastic junk that might be worn out? This thing shouldn't be getting stuck like that. you think if I take it apart I can clean up that spot its getting stuck? If anyone has any pictures of a disassembled primary for a 95 xlt id appreciate seeing them. I dont have a puller, so its gonna be a pain in the a**. ;-\

Thanks
-steve

(p.s i know i shouldn't be running the sled without the belt on, but i had to see what was going on)
 

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A couple of likely possibilities:

- the weight bearings/bushings are gone and the weights pivot at an angle other than 90 degrees to their respective pins. Most likely you'd need to replace weights and pins both, but I'd check the spider first to make sure you haven't worn a slice out of and alongside one or more of the slots in it.

- you might also have binding in the outer plate bushing and/or the shaft it rides on. That needs periodic lubrication or it can ruin things.
 

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Just happened to me a week ago. You can probably see the weights sitting in there cocked at an angle. I needed a new clutch but that was mostly due to the previous owner's stupidity. While it's <hopefully> not likely that you'll need a whole clutch like I did, check with us before you shell out almost $500 for a new one at your dealer. I replaced mine with a newer 6-tower for $229. If you need one, we'll find you one.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We'll I definitely wont be buying new, I have one off a 92 or 93 RXL im sure will work just fine. Its just at my parents place that is 300 km's away. Its just a pain
 

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dont put any lube on your clutch! it will certainly find its way onto the belt.[/b]
That's the worst piece of advice I have ever taken in regard to clutches. I know that people don't agree on this but I have always had very good luck using a lubricant on my clutches. Weights last so much longer as does the clutch in general. Polaris used to sell - maybe still does - clutch and cable lube, a medium weight oil. That worked well on weight pivots and rollers as well as the shaft which the other plate bearing/bushing slides on. Neglecting those can and will result in significantly more rapid wear. I do see a sticky oil residue on my belt guard as a result of use of oil based lubricants but it has never created a belt problem for me - belts usually go 3000-6000 miles. It undoubtedly would if I over-did the oiling. Presently I often use the Comet dry clutch molybdenum aerosol spray which seems to work well - this in deference to the no oil idea. I still use an oil based product - ATF fluid- when the machines have to sit or conditions begin to get wet. Summer, I go so far as to spray LPS 3, the aerosol waxy protectant on clutch parts since machines are stored in outdoor environs.

Everyone has to decide this issue themselves. I'm content to buy my own clutches - I'm not about to pay for anyone else's clutch problems.
 

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63 it's a performance issue for some, concerning oil and clutches. Some racers will go to extreme measures ( you know, something like promise a vote for Hilary Clinton) for a couple extras sled lengths in a 1/8 mile, so getting oil on clutch sheaves is to be avoided. Putting ANY petroleum based product (either directly or indirectly) on clutch faces will cause a decrease in acceleration and speed, period. Belt slip is something to avoid if a low ET is wanted. That said, if you intend to keep your sled 10 years, and ride it 1,000+ miles each year, and don't really care if you out run your buddy's sled, then I am with you when you say that lubing the internal clutch parts will give you longer service life. So in short, I guess it's what is more important to you. The other thing to remember is that most oil type lubes attract moisture, and that can be a bad thing when it's 5 degrees, and your sled has been outside all night. Also oil based lubes also collect dirt, which will cause more wear. So I would suggest the dry type lubes and the LPS3 / WD-40 stuff that displaces water. So Tifa, would you go to that extreme for a couple sled lengths? :undercover:
 

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all the bushings in your clutch are designed to run dry. combine oil with belt dust and you have a gummy mess and still have a sticky clutch.
 

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For the sake of argument, chain lube is designed to do everthing that might we might want to happen here. Low sling, good penetration, moisture proof, doesn't attract....um....stuff, designed to protect against corrosion, etc.
 

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Good Lord Mike. I've been riding 35 years and have never washed a belt. You sure that's not a just racer thing? I do believe in breaking a belt in though. Getting a layer of crud off of the sheaves is something else. I do keep them clean (but not likely as well as you do).
 

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I would imagine my wife and I run close to $3000 worth of fuel through our machines in a year. Consequently, I don't want to be shelling out more $$$ or removing clutches every 1000 miles for maintenance. And you're right, I could care less about how fast I get there really. (We have nothing over 100 hp anyway.) I figure if the belts can last several thousand miles when run on machines usually with sleds in tow - figure at least 100 pounds empty and normally several times that amount with a load of some sort- then I don't think we're getting a whole lot of oil in things. I agree about keeping things out of the sheaves and work pretty hard at that though washing would be a very extreme exercise for me. A bit of light solvent is the best they ever see. Many clutches have been retired without noticable wear to or gunky residues on the sheaves. I do prefer not to spin any oil onto the guards but notice that that's where the oil goes. It certainly doesn't stay in the rollers or weights to a degree great enough to attract anything. Dirt is the least of my problem IOW. I know the manuals for present production machines say the clutches don't need lube but they also don't say that the clutch will need to have parts replacements or work every 1500 miles or so when they are run dry. I prefer to use a lube and put off time, money, and effort investments if I can. More oil gets around clutches from exhaust manifolds than from the clutch itself anyway.
 

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I completely agree that we don't want oil on the belt, however I have never seen any sign that it was getting on it. And yes, you're right about the oil flying off - at least much of it - and I do wish there was a good way to get a tiny bit in just the right places with no extra. Apparently not all flies off as it is clear that oiling on a regular basis does prolong the life of parts which otherwise wear rather quickly. I also totally understand why racers and others who are on their throttles hard don't want even the remotest oily film or residue which might give something up to "the other guy." The most frequent cause of belt slippage for me has always involved the intake of snow. I am not arguing that anyone is wrong not to oil. I just mention it as a way to prolong clutch parts. Some may find a down side to it.
 

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where do you usually oil? the pins or more places? i can see a benefit to oiling the weight pins. my weights never stay in long enough to wear...lol!
 

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I do the pins - usually after I have just returned from riding, while the clutch is still nice and warm (which helps draw the oil into the right places easily). The shaft on which the bearing of the outer cover slides also gets about three drops. Every once in awhile I put a bit of oil in the rollers. That's it - nothing else. I don't lubricate when I'm going to be running the engine again right away.

I should point out that our riding occurs near or on the frozen ocean which likely hastens corrosion and wear (and stuck and flattened rollers). Oil, obviously, is a method of deterring that.
 

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I don't know about that 20k mile thing......

If Polaris doesn't get off there a$$ and build something that raises enough interest, with the way snow conditions and the economy are, I'll bet we start seeing more and more of them......
 
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