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Discussion Starter #1
Having just bought a new sportbike, it looks like the 01 will be around for another year. I am happy enough with the power(dynoprt single, MBRP quiet, v-force, plugs indexed, jetting is good), but could really stand to shed some weight. I ride very aggressively mostly trails and fields with lots of jumping, so the strength of parts needs to as strong or stronger than stock. Ive thought of replacement trailing arms(both chrommolly and carbon fiber), skis, chaincase to belt conversion, seats, etc.
So the question is.. for around a grand what are the most effective, durable ways to shed maximum weight.
Thanks in advance.
Only 6 months till winter!!
 

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Would the chaincase conversion not use most of your 1000 buck right there?
 

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Take out the small idler wheels and blocks.  Add graphite sliders and pretreat them before installing.  Run this if you have lots of snow.  Put on a lexan hood 11lb saving.  Another thing people forget is they spend thousands to take weight of the sled but most of us don't want to lose that spare tire that hangs over the belt.
 

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If you want a big diet, start with the front of the sled. Lexan hood is good, but not so durable. Some things like wiring, gages, hoses and stuff can be looked at. Doo did a very good job on these sleds with weight. They had to take the next step with the REV to go any lighter. The flex skis are light, you could spend $300+ and only loose a pound. Make a list of what you have to have, and lose the rest. after that, look into the parts. Here is a good site for that:

http://www.specialtysleds.com/

They have some info on gutting sleds and front susp. arms that are light and duralbe. Heat treated 7075 Alum. and Boss seats.
 

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I hate to be the bringer of gloom and doom but on your sled , for trail riding it isnt cost effective to shed weight as the cost per pound, or negative pound wont yeild shite.
 

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For hard trail riding i would leave it the way it is, unless you are just going to drag it then you can pick it apart, but like mxz800 said ski doo done a great job in making these sleds light while still keeping them solid enough to take a pounding so i would probably leave it as is unless you have alot of money to throw away on aftermarket parts.
 

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LMAO at at xotar
It's true though.I weigh in at well over
200lbs so i don't see much need for reducing the weight of the
sled.And like the others said you don't want to take away from
the structual rigidity of the sled itself especially if you do some
hard trail riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I weigh in at a fairly trim 175, so no room for change there. I am very wary of changing anything structural, but really want a lighter sled to throw around in the air and and easier to lift out of bad stucks. Truth is i have a little cash to burn and upgrading these things is an addiction. I am planning to call and get some info on a belt drive change over, a few pounds lighter and less rotational mass. Anyone have or seen one of these kits??
 

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I have seen them however not for Ski-doo.  They retail for almost $2g's
 

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dont ride with a full tank, saves quite a bit
 

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Drive belt conversion: I saw an article in Snowtech this year. I'll try to find it.

Nico: Right on about that
I would notice a big difference in my MXZ 440's handling when the tank was near empty compared to full.
 
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