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Discussion Starter #1
Need some help! I' have a 02 ZR600 I'm taking off the shocks to send them out to get them revalved and the oil changed. I'm having problems with the rear shock cannot get the top bolt past the spring any secret tips!!!!! I've always had somebody work on my sled,but have decided to try and do little things myself which turn into big things(that's what happens when you give a carpenter a wrench) Any input would be appreciated thanks, dc
 

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The best way to remove the shocks if you are not removing the rear suspension out of the sled is to support the rear of the sled off the ground. Be Carefull when do this step, take the bolt out that holds the front part of the rear spring in. Make sure you have a firm grip on the spring. Take the nut off the bolt and leave the bolt in the hole. The grab the spring and pull up (long part of spring that runs to the front of the sled). Pull up enough to get the bolt out. Once the bolt is out swing the spring out past the track. Once that is done you should be able to manuver the spring on the shaft enough to get the bolt out that holds the rear shock in. I have done it this way several times with out much trouble. I hope this helps. I have the same sled and this worked just fine to get the bolt out.
 

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dc-cat...I'm curious to know what lead you to the conclusion to having your rear shocks revalved.  Are you changing the valving or are you just having them serviced as stated in service/owners manual.  I also have an 02 ZR600, I currently have the skid frame out of mine, I'm in the process of installing the heavier springs that were available.  I was told by my dealer that I shouldn't have to have the shocks revalved, just the normal shock servicing, as the heavier springs will make a big difference.  I felt that the rear was a little to soft for me even with the the spring cams turned to the stiffest postion.  
I guess I'm just curious to know more about why you're revalving and what type of riding you do.
 

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I also put in the heavier springs. i did not revalve the shocks when I did it either. The sled is stiffer in the rear and is a more comfortable ride now. Deffinately worth the time and money if you like to catch some air every so often.
 

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Are you guys saying it's possible to remove the front and rear shock from the skid frame without removing the skid frame from the sled?

This spring I removed the skid from my 01 zrt6 so I could remove the shocks to have them rebuilt.  I've never removed the skid from a sled before.  Just curious how you would remove the lower (front) bolt on the rear shock.  It is sandwiched between two idlers wheels.  I had to remove the cross shaft bolt and pound/slide the whole idler wheel assmebly ahead so I could remove it from between the rails.  This then allowed me slide off one wheel so I could remove the bolt holding the shock to the bracket between the idler wheels.

I'm going to try and make the tool that some dealers have that you slide over the spring that allows you to install/remove the end of the spring that sets on top of the 3 sided adjustmet puck.

How does everyone else take out and re-install their skid frame?

Thanks for any advice,
David
 

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You can do it without taking the skid out of the sled. I prefere to remove the skid but I have done it without. You do have to loosen up the bars at the front of the skid in order to spread the rails enough to move the lower part of the shock and the idler wheels out as a unit. You have to play around with it some but it can be a pain to get the shocks back in as there is a bit of pressure pushing against you to get the bolts back through the holes. And to be honest with you removing the skid and reinstalling it isn't as hard as you may think. Even re-aligning the track isn't too difficult. You can get a starting adjustment by getting an equal amount of threads show on the bolts on each side. The best way to learn is to try. I have found alot of little short cuts by playing around. yeah once in awhile you get into a jam but you can always find a way out. As long as when you are done the track runs equal on both sides, meaning strait between the rails you should be fine. Keep in mind that the rails can sometimes be slightly out of wack and you will have to use your best judgement. If you do decide to remove the skid make sure you take all the tension off the track. And take the front of the springs off the skid and the off the adjustment blocks in the rear. Once you do that swing the springs out so that you can get the close to parallel to the rails. I found a bungee cord or tying them up with some duct tape helps. ( Wrap the duct tape around one spring then strech it across and wrap it around the other so that they can swing down past the rails) This will help so that they aren't working against you. Hope this helps. I tried to explain evrything the best I could.
 

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I have taken out my shock several times.  I don't take my skid though.  I have never had problem with the top bolt.  but I did have to take the idler wheel assembly out to get one wheel off, I didn't have to loosen any of the other cross bars.  I know some people that just leave those wheels off so that they can get the shock out easier.  I don't like taking the skid out because it is so much work to get it back in the track by your self.  aligning the track is easy though, I don't use the rails to align it I use the rear outer wheels and the outer drive lugs.  The siffer valving will make a big difference too. I put a Sno Pro shock in my ZL and now I don't even have to have the spring set up all the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Iron Will thanks for the tip took 10 min.  I'm having the oil changed and revalved because I had a friend that had Shock therapy do it and they set it up for weight and riding style said it was well worth the money so I thought I would give it a try thanks again dc
 

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The only thing I can add is that if you get used to taking the skid frame out...it's like anything else, you do it a few times and it gets pretty easy.   Just a tip for anyone who's interested.  I installed in my garage in one of the main roof rafters/joist (whatever you call it) a screw in eyebolt, 3/8" I believe plus a 3/8" openable link connector.  Then I bought a 1 or 2 ton come-along, which are readily available from any of the "marts" or Meijers.  This makes it real handy for lifting the back end up quickly plus it is very stable.  Like I said, to me it is much easier to pull skid out rather than fumbling around with it in the tunnel, it also came in very handy when I had to swap a motor.  
I was going to ask the question about the idler wheels that are in the way, but I see you all have already crossed that bridge.  

For all the guys who change the shocks with the skid in the tunnel...can you give us a band-aid count, you can usually figure on leaving some skin in there
 

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I believe I made out only using two last time I was in there doing it that way. I prefere to pull the skid mainly cause I can check the hole thing over better that way.
 
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