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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a 2002 600 Classic Touring (Polaris). I'm new to snowmobiling, should i get my track studded? I have asked a few people and i have received different answers. Some say no and some say definatly get it done. I was just wondering if you men and women could give your opinions on this. I figured i could reach a wider range of people thanks to the internet.

Thanks for any information
 

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I do stud mine.the reason being I see a lot of icy trails.if you will be encountering icy trails, I would recommend them.
 
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</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (zert800 @ Sep. 12, 2002, 3:51pm)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">From the safety aspect I would, it definetly increases your stopping ability.[/b][/quote]
I agree, you need the ability to stop quickly, doesn't matter if you're going fast or slow.  It is just smart sledding.
 

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You could go with 48 studs for extra stopping, but with a 600 you may want to opt for 96 studs.
Caleb
 

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I think Sled Dogg is right,

96 should be the minimum, all in the center belt.

For a 600cc sled all stud manufacturers recommend
"AT LEAST" 96 studs.

You can spend the extra on studs now, or on a new track when they start pulling through.

Welcome to the site.

DP
 

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It all depends on the riding conditoins you have most of the time. For the areas I ride in, I would say that they are almost a must if you want to be safe and have alot more fun.
 

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Dooski, I have the same sled with original track that the first owner put 196 inside and out. Thinking of going to a 1.25 with 144 in the middle. Are you using the stock track and what pattern are you going to use? JQ
 

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I agree studding makes for quick stopping but gives your sled a diffrent ride.

I myself like the loose feel of the back of the sled so I don't stud my sled any more.
 

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I'm in the same situation as frostbit.  I run a 1.375 stiff paddle which gives my plenty of traction for the trails when I ride them.  The only ice I see is the occasional slough so I have no real need for studs.  What kind of rider are you and what kind of conditions do you ride in?  Welcome to the snowmobile world I'm sure you'll enjoy it.
 

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It is amazing how much better you can hookup with a lager paddle track. It will make a huge difference. But on the really hard stuff you can't beat a studded track. I run 144 with 9 inches of carbide up front. Alot of fun both into and out of the corners.
 

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In my opinion it really depends on how and where you ride. I ride in northern Maine exclusively (may try New Brunswick this year) and I ride strictly on groomed trails and I see no need to stud my machine (had them and I removed them). I see little to no icy conditions, and in early season riding it can wreak havoc on your studs. If I saw icy conditions on a regular basis, I would stud for safety, in powder they would do nothing for you, my conditions opinions vary, but my brother has two identical 98 MXZ 500's one which is studded and the other is not and on the average groomed trail I see there is absolutley no difference in performace (studded one has 96) they both hook up the same and stop the same, the difference must be so slight we cant tell. We dont have to worry about throwing a stud and puncturing a radiator (I used to own a radiator shop and used to fix a lot of them). Your track also influences wether to stud or not, a 1.25" track is pushing the envelope on stud length because of the leverage they have against the track, if you abuse it it will probably end up tearing the track. So if you ride a lot of ice, definetly stud, if you see alot of rocks, stumps, and roads it may not be wise, if you ride in off trail powder, or on ungroomed trails dont waste the money. The bonus I see is my sleds have 5 and 6000 miles on them with original tracks in excellent condition, not may people can claim that with studs, just look at the sled for sale ads with machines with 2000 miles on them with new tracks! Good luck in your decision.
 

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Depending on where you are from too will make a big differnce. Here in MN most of the trails around my house you can't run studs on - so I don't have them. If I had my way I would but becuase of where I ride I haven't taken the plunge on my new sled.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks everyone for your opinions. I will be rding a lot up in Canada (Coldwwater) and i will be riding down at my hunting camp in southern NY. I know that there are a lot of water crossings up in Canada so lots of ice i asume. I think i may go with the 96 Studs down the center, what size studs should i get? Like i said im new to this sport. I have been ATVing for 6 years now and know quit a bit on ATVing, but snowmobiling i still have A LOT to learn. Looks like my buddies will be saying
this year!!  


Thanks Again

Ray
 

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96 down the center should be good.  It definately gives a different ride if you're not used to them.  I myself, wouldnt be without them.  Just my $.02.
 
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