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i just stored my two sleds fist time sleds i ever owend the dealer says to spray the fog in the engin for 30 sendents in each of the carbs is that long a nuff or should it be longer after i put gas stable in it and then put stored oil on the whole sled is that good or should i do more?
 

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All i ever done to store my sleds is drain the carbs and poor a bit of mixing oil into the cylinder and add some gas stable to it. Never have any trouble in the winter geting them going, just the regular tune up and carb clean and away we go.


I never herd of the engine fog what does it do?
 

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For more information: check out the main topic above titled "How to properly store the sled?".

I'll be a hipocryt and state that fogging is a good idea. I say this because although in the past it seemed like no big deal to me, this spring was an odd one. Warm days and extremely cold nights resulted in condensation on an antique car's engine in our garage... I'm pretty sure some of that must have made its way into the engine, and water in the engine is not a good thing. Fogging doesn't stop this, but it protects the parts from the damage from condensation build up in the engine. Taking car to make sure the engine is "dry" before finally starting it and using it regularly for winter should be safer than simply starting it every now and then while there's water in the cylinders.

I start my sled every so often, hence calling myself a hipocryt. But this was the first spring I've seen so much condensation, and so far I've had no bad luck (generally speaking, this is a heated debate when fogging for only a few months, because damage is so minute that nobody notices, and the engine could still last ten years; however if you're storing the engine for more than a full year, it would be smart to either give it a good run every now and then, or take measures such as fogging).

Ah... it's been so long since I've flung stuff on this forum... lol.

Anyway, 30 seconds is not always the norm... read the instructions with the fogging oil you purchased. There are also different techniques, so ask around. Have fun, winter will be back before you know it! :)
 

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probably is long enough. I have sled running and air box off drown it till it dies. pull plugs and spray in cylinder. fall comes give it a couple pulls with the plugs out put in new and go. I am sure there are as many methods of fogging as there are opinions. it protects the crank bearings from rust.
 

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I agree with dooman,,, start spraying at a point where you are getting both cylinders and spray until it dies,,,, when done, spray a little more in the cylinders (through the plug holes) and call her quits,,,, I also stabilize my gas before I do the fogging,,, put your stabilizer in and mix it up good,,, then run the sled long enough that stabilized gas gets into the carbs or efi,,,, then fog it afterwards,,,,
I went with the start it every month method and I lost 3 motors that year,,, 1 was my own fault, but the other 2 I dont feel where,,,, so its back to stabilizing the gas and fogging the motor for me,,,,
 

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Another thing I over-heard when at one of the dealers was someone losing their engine due to fogging. They said he should have let the engine warm up to at least 100F before giving it to 'er to burn off some of the fogging oil. Basically, if you're in the habit of letting the sled warm up before taking off you'll be fine anyway. But I guess there are still some people out there who go full throttle the second the engine turns over. Possible it had nothing to do with fogging at all, but that's what they seemed to be blaming it on.
 

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I add stabil to the gas and let it run for ten minutes to get hot, then I just spray the fogging oil right into the air box until it dies. Stuff a rag in the exhaust outlet and cover it for the summer.

Then I start working on the polishing, waxing, and customizing for the next winter.
 
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