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Discussion Starter #21
id have to say from the pics, spend the extra money and just get a new sled. it looks like its been to hell and back and few time. for like 1200 bucks you can buy a nice 98 xc 600 or something.[/b]

Id love to, but don't have the money. I know some will say you gotta pay to play, and if you cant afford it then dont. But im not asking you guys to make this sled perform like new :), i just want to be able to ride it..

So Heres my question 1: Extending the tunnel, is this to just keep snow from flinging up or is it because the SKS suspension won't mount up without the tunnel being extended?

Question 2: Can the suspension already on it be salvaged? Could i just swap a different shock in?

I know it sucks trying to help someone who doesnt know ####, bear with me, im in the process of rebuilding a 3.2 for my taurus SHO, im mechanically inclined but very new to snowmobiles. I really think i could pull off the SKS swap into my sled. So once again, THANK YOU for taking the time to read all this, and for trying to help me.

Whats My biggest hurdle with the SKS swap into my EFI? If theres some cutting and welding involved i can handle it, i do have a tiny wire feed in my garage. But major fabrication is out of the question.
 

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Id love to, but don't have the money. I know some will say you gotta pay to play, and if you cant afford it then dont. But im not asking you guys to make this sled perform like new :), i just want to be able to ride it..

So Heres my question 1: Extending the tunnel, is this to just keep snow from flinging up or is it because the SKS suspension won't mount up without the tunnel being extended?

Question 2: Can the suspension already on it be salvaged? Could i just swap a different shock in?

I know it sucks trying to help someone who doesnt know ####, bear with me, im in the process of rebuilding a 3.2 for my taurus SHO, im mechanically inclined but very new to snowmobiles. I really think i could pull off the SKS swap into my sled. So once again, THANK YOU for taking the time to read all this, and for trying to help me.

Whats My biggest hurdle with the SKS swap into my EFI? If theres some cutting and welding involved i can handle it, i do have a tiny wire feed in my garage. But major fabrication is out of the question.[/b]
un plug the cdi and battery and i d think youd be fine welding. also most stuff is alum on the body not steel but you should really have to weld anything. you can replace the shock but id suggest rebplacing a few more thing then that if your going to go that way. a tunnel extension is 90 bucks i think from tracksusa.com they are the cheapest around.
 

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<<<Can the suspension already on it be salvaged? Could i just swap a different shock in? >>>

Um, yes. That's what I've been suggesting (through the last two messages) as the avenue most likely to provide the mostest for the leastest. IT IS GOING TO BE LABOR INTENSIVE. But it looks possible, and labor is cheap when you're doing it yourself. Everything must be completely disassembled, wire wheeled, painted, lubed, and reassembled. New shocks would be nice, but may not be necessary. A few bearings here and there wouldn't surprise me (but they're cheap). What you will learn from the whole experience is a big deal regarding maintenance on this sled and any other you own from now on.

To be honest the big drawback to the SKS conversion is your chances of succes are not good with your skill level, AND the fact you may be getting into just as much trouble with that suspension as you have with this one once it's installed.
 

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<<<Can the suspension already on it be salvaged? Could i just swap a different shock in? >>>

Um, yes. That's what I've been suggesting (through the last two messages) as the avenue most likely to provide the mostest for the leastest. IT IS GOING TO BE LABOR INTENSIVE. But it looks possible, and labor is cheap when you're doing it yourself. Everything must be completely disassembled, wire wheeled, painted, lubed, and reassembled. New shocks would be nice, but may not be necessary. A few bearings here and there wouldn't surprise me (but they're cheap). What you will learn from the whole experience is a big deal regarding maintenance on this sled and any other you own from now on.

To be honest the big drawback to the SKS conversion is your chances of succes are not good with your skill level, AND the fact you may be getting into just as much trouble with that suspension as you have with this one once it's installed.[/b]
ya maintainence from here forward should become a big deal. i grease everything before i ride (every single ride) i also check to make sure all the suspension bolts are tight, all engine parts look good, no missing springs on exhuast. track tneison is good. fluids are all good, general looks for cracks and so on. it take about 5 to 8 min and can save hundreds of dollars. nothing like suddenly come of a jumps and have the pipe go smashing into your brake caliber. just another expensive mistake. relaly if you put 20 hours into it, that suspension could be as good as new.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
un plug the cdi and battery and i d think youd be fine welding. also most stuff is alum on the body not steel but you should really have to weld anything. you can replace the shock but id suggest rebplacing a few more thing then that if your going to go that way. a tunnel extension is 90 bucks i think from tracksusa.com they are the cheapest around.[/b]
Exactly what do i need the tunnel extension for? Will i not be even able to bolt up without it? im sorry but this still hasnt been clarified.

<<<Can the suspension already on it be salvaged? Could i just swap a different shock in? >>>

Um, yes. That's what I've been suggesting (through the last two messages) as the avenue most likely to provide the mostest for the leastest. IT IS GOING TO BE LABOR INTENSIVE. But it looks possible, and labor is cheap when you're doing it yourself. Everything must be completely disassembled, wire wheeled, painted, lubed, and reassembled. New shocks would be nice, but may not be necessary. A few bearings here and there wouldn't surprise me (but they're cheap). What you will learn from the whole experience is a big deal regarding maintenance on this sled and any other you own from now on.

To be honest the big drawback to the SKS conversion is your chances of succes are not good with your skill level, AND the fact you may be getting into just as much trouble with that suspension as you have with this one once it's installed.[/b]
Sorry for the confusion, as said i know its not easy dealing with a n00b. I dont think you fully understand the problem. Its not as simple as disassembling the entire thing and putting it back together, while that helps, it wont fix my problem. I did that 3 times last year, pulled the entire thing out and put it back in. Because this suspension is rigged together with pieces from all kinds of other sleds, I do not know what size, type, brand etc. etc. of shock to get, no idea in the slightest. If the price of a new track is any indication as to how much a new shock will be, i wont be able to afford it.

ya maintainence from here forward should become a big deal. i grease everything before i ride (every single ride) i also check to make sure all the suspension bolts are tight, all engine parts look good, no missing springs on exhuast. track tneison is good. fluids are all good, general looks for cracks and so on. it take about 5 to 8 min and can save hundreds of dollars. nothing like suddenly come of a jumps and have the pipe go smashing into your brake caliber. just another expensive mistake. relaly if you put 20 hours into it, that suspension could be as good as new.[/b]
Thank you for your imput, i didnt know it was THAT important to grease everything, i thought it was a once a season deal. I'll be sure to bust out the grease gun first thing! 20 hours is no problem, but 20 hours of labor and HOW much money in parts? :) :p

Im going into the garage right now to pull the old suspension out. I'll take more pics for ya guys!

Thanks for looking!

P.S. even if the SKS suspension wont work is the sled still worth buying for 100? no hood, no front skis, seat is slightly ripped and not much of a motor left. But for a hundred bucks, couldnt i just sell the track and suspension for more then that?
 

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Save the 100 for parts on the one you've got. The SKS sounds like a boat anchor.
 

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Yes, you should be able to bolt in the SKS suspension. You will need to do something about the tunnel extension. That's the easy part.
Cut off the back section of the SKS tunnel. Cut off the back of your tunnel. Rivet on the section of the SKS tunnel. Make it the same length the SKS tunnel was to begin with. Cheap and easy.
 
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