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Discussion Starter #1
Is it worth going to a new style rubber track or go full vintage and get a cleated track like OEM . For a '78 jd spitfire 340 f/a
Any opinions ?
 

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It depends on what you want to do. If you want it authentic, get the old style track. If you want it usable, get a new one... :)

dave
 

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I would go without cleats especially if this sled is for young kids or new riders. Those things were brutal on ice or hard packed snow. If they went sideways it was like having skateblades under your sled. I don't know how many times we rolled our Spitfire because of the track.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you

I appreciate your opinions guys , the sled is a resto from my childhood and I remember the bad times when trying to cross roadways especially. I am not after a vintage original but a cool useable sled for my step son ...... So full on rubber new age it is !!!
 

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Track

So where do you find a rubber track?
I have a 1979 trailfire with the original track and would like to upgrade to rubber but can't find one. I have read about converting to a liquifire drive and track but those are hard to find as well. Have also read about putting the suspension and track off of a Indy 500 under it. Help/suggestions?
 

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Check out Dennis Kirk - they carry a lot of vintage sled parts including new tracks.

What you need to know is the size of your track. There are three important numbers to know - the pitch, the width and the length.

The pitch is the distance from one window in the track to the next. The most common pitch is 2.52" but I don't know if they had standardized on it back in '79. Other sizes from older machines are 1.97" and 3.29".

The width if just how wide the track is.

The length is the total circumference of the track. Easiest way to measure this is to figure out the pitch of the track and multiply by the number of windows in the track. For example 2.52 pitch x 48 windows = 120.96" -> you would be looking for a 121" track.

Figure out these three numbers, then just go look for a track that matches. Here are a couple of places to look:

https://www.denniskirk.com/snowmobile/tracks/20.ipp/pricedesc.srt

http://www.shadetreepowersports.com/v/application-charts/chartS/kimpex-tracks-chart-m.html

http://www.tracksusa.com/tracks.html

Actually - here is someone that has a pretty big write-up on them:
http://jdsleds.wikispot.org/Track/Suspension

Good luck!
dave
 
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