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Just wondering how long everyone warms there sled up before riding, and what your opinions are on this.
 

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Feel the head and when it's fully heated you can proceed slowly for a good 5 to 10 minutes before wailing on it. This should prevent a cold seize which can be quite costly to repair.

Jeff
 

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i always go and start mine up.Go back in and get dressed and about 5 to 10 min later its ready to go not sure if you have a heat guage or not but mine is about 1/4 of the way up after 5 min or so_Or if you have no heat guage you can reach under and feel the heat exchanger .

then i lift up the back of sled give it a couple good drops to loosen the ice build up.Then jump on and take it easy for about 5 min to get the belt warmed up. THEN LET ER RIP. :rolleyes:
 

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i always go and start mine up.Go back in and get dressed and about 5 to 10 min later its ready to go not sure if you have a heat guage or not but mine is about 1/4 of the way up after 5 min or so_Or if you have no heat guage you can reach under and feel the heat exchanger .

then i lift up the back of sled give it a couple good drops to loosen the ice build up.Then jump on and take it easy for about 5 min to get the belt warmed up. THEN LET ER RIP. :rolleyes:[/b]
Yup. I do pretty much the same thing but I also have a jack to lift up the back end and run the track a little once the engine has warmed up.
 

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I don't let mine warm up that long unless it's bitter cold but am very careful for the first couple of minutes to take it very easy.
 

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Thanks guys, now if I can only get mine to hold an idle longer than 30 seconds I'll be golden :bash:
 

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start it before you put your gear on and i keep checking the heat exchanger under the tunnel and dont get on to the gas hard untill i feel heat in it.
 

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If I'm at home I start the sled, go get dressed, then head out and check the coolers...they have to be nice and warm...then I blurp the throttle a few times with the back end up on a stand and get the belt warmed up and the track rotating free.
 

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If I'm at home I start the sled, go get dressed, then head out and check the coolers...they have to be nice and warm...then I blurp the throttle a few times with the back end up on a stand and get the belt warmed up and the track rotating free.[/b]

I concur
 

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This is a great thread.

So here's a related question I was thinking about yesterday. After you've taken like a 5 to 10 minute break, do you need to "rewarm" at all? Because the hill climbing is tiring and I have to shut down the machine all the time to rest, then I wonder if I should be just pulling the cord and running right up the hill again? Any comments?
 

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I find rewarming can be necessary, typically you can tell by the sound of your sled (slower at picking up to idle rpm). Basically, I know a good temp to finally give it to her is within 20*F of the ideal cool riding temp (if you have a temperature gauge, it won't take long to learn what temperature your sled wants to ride at to give the best response and gas mileage).

When first taking my sled out: inspect suspension and track, freeing up any ice that might rub or interfere with the performance of the sled. Bounce the arse end of 'er 3 times to help aid in this process :D. Make sure skis aren't stuck (if it's on snow, you should be fine, however I've had my skags stick to PAVEMENT and was kinda shocked by the whole experience). Start the engine. If it's cold, it will not idle. It will stall out. Start it again. If it's really cold, it will do this again. Start it again, it should be fine now. After it has idled to 35 or 40*F, gently burp the throttle to prevent oil build up during the warm-up process (not necessary, doesn't typically happen, but I find if you let any 2-stroke idle too long, like say 5-10mins, you'll cut the spark plugs life in half) and do so for each increase of 5*F until it is within 20*F of your ideal cool riding temperature. Then, by the time I cross the street, ride by 4 houses and a building, and hit the trails, it is above the ideal cool riding temp and I can GIVE IT TO HER! Because if I don't let it warm up that much, I know I will not be able to refrain from giving it a huge burst of gas the second I think it's safe to do so.

I never HAVE to do the warm up like this, but may as well. Why not? lol.
 
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