Snowmobile World banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I may be shopping for a different sled. One thing I now know, I MUST HAVE ELECTRIC STARTER.

What else would you suggest?

What gauges are a good idea? (My A.C. 1979 Lynx 2000T has no gauges.)
Do any sleds have a built-in storage space (like, does the seat lift up and have storage underneath)?
Do any brands have a particular reputation for reliability?
Do any brands have a rep for being easy to work on?

When looking at a used sled for sale, what questions should I ask the owner?

Also, this time I really want a trailer so I can go to some meets. What I've heard at SnowmobileWorld makes meets sounds like a lot of fun! Any ideas on what to look for in a trailer?

I fell so stupid. :withstupid: I bought my first sled this fall, after just a few rides already love snowmobiling and have even started thinking about learning how to do my own work on it (I used to repair cars to help earn money for college, though that was a LONG time ago), but I just don't have the strength in my arms to pull the damn cord.

Local snowmobile shops don't seem to be at all interested in helping me, though I'm perfectly happy to pay $$ if they could install an add-on anything. (Another reason I'm thinking of learning to do my own work.)

Any ideas would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,560 Posts
Not going to get too specific with brands/models, there's likely going to be enough of that here. What I would suggest though, is that in addition to electric start (I'm 6'2"/300lbs, still appreciate that on cold mornings!!) you should be looking for reverse (way high on list!) but likely as imprtant as both of those together is something with a later model, LONG travel, suspension. The nicest sled in the world is useless if you are too sore to get out and ride it......

Welcome to snowmobiling!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
If you are buying used, you can always get it checked out by a dealership (with a general fee of $25.00 they'll let you know EVERYTHING that is wrong with it, top to bottom). Also, buy/borrow a compression tester and check each cylinder (it's not always easy to tell if the engine needs working on, regardless of what the owner says. Sure it may never have needed service, that isn't to say it soon will).

Aside from that, don't be afraid to test ride a few sleds. Most dealerships will let you test ride used sleds, and most people will as well. If it's used and they won't let you test ride it, odds are there's something wrong with it. If it doesn't run perfect on your test ride it could be as simple as a tune up, but if the plug caps get thrown off (for example) it could mean more serious problems.

Ask around, size things up in person (I would not recommend buying on the Internet, although many people never have problems I prefer to look in person; especially if a comfortable ride is important; the only way to tell is to actually ride it).

Other than that, have fun :)
 

·
oldslowsledder
Joined
·
6,491 Posts
Buy the latest model sled you can afford, the technology and reliability have made major strides. As stated above reverse is a must for the wife and I. She prefers a fan cooled sled, not as fast but considerably lighter.
Definitely have the sled checked out by someone you can trust before laying down the money, either a knowledgeable friend or pay for an inspection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,560 Posts
Hey! Just thought of something. See tons of times where somebody goes out and buys a sled, THEN asks if everyone here thinks they got a good deal. Just thinking, you might want to ask that question......BEFORE you buy it. Some sleds are problematic in certain areas, and at the least, somebody familiar with the model you are looking at may be able to give you a very good idea of exactly what to look for (and where to find it) when you go to check out a prospective purchase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
Well, hopefully people who use these forums think of that. I've seen examples of both, and that's pretty much one of the purposes of these forums. We're all here to help each other out, even if there's people like me on here who's not good at doing much beyond burning gas.

PS Not all air cooled snowmobiles are lighter than liquid cooled, it depends on the sled. Typically a 2-up air cooled sled is still heavier than a liquid cooled 1-up. If ya want proof, compare the Polaris Trail Touring Deluxe 550f (roughly 545lbs) to the 600 Fusion liquid cooled (roughly 495lbs). That's a noticeable difference and a much better handling machine as well, I might add. The Trail Touring Deluxe is probably Polaris' most tippy machine of all time. I owned one, and unless you had a passenger on the back, it was garbage. I was paranoid of hitting a bump without getting it head on. I was driving it straight one time, the trail was a bit rough, but one ski caught. I was riding on one ski trying to get the thing back down on two skis before she flipped herself over for no good reason. The Fusion: drives herself. I've hit drifts before I knew they were there, just to discover the Fusion will keep going straight without flipping over as long as you don't turn the handlbars.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top