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I just rented a forest service cabin in Wyoming. Between my wife, dogs, sleeping gear and food it took me 5 trips in and 4 trips out. I need a alarge towable sleds. Any recomendations? Thanks alot, Reed
 

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I just rented a forest service cabin in Wyoming. Between my wife, dogs, sleeping gear and food it took me 5 trips in and 4 trips out. I need a alarge towable sleds. Any recomendations? Thanks alot, Reed[/b]

I`m thinking about making some so I will be watching this to see what peoples input is on this as far as a good size, style and construction . M
 

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The yellow fiberglass ones which Nith Valley Sled's link shows are a familar sight locally. I didn't have a lot of faith in them when they first showed up but people do haul some big loads in cold temps and they seem to hold up. (I'm thinking 1000 pounds or more when I say big.)

I would stay away from most formed plastic sleds- the ones which are formed by vacuum and heat. Sheet plastic designs are good however if they are made from UHMW polyethylene 1/4" would be a minimum thickness I'd recommend. You can see some here - http://www.northernsledworks.com/Huntingpics.html (and I've seen some of the actual people and sleds in their pics so I know how their stuff is used and holds up.)

Basket sleds are also a very good option. In rural Alaska it is not uncommon to pay $100 per running foot of sled length when buying them so they aren't inexpensive, but it is still a bargain.


These sleds are usually built from hickory.
 

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I`m thinking about making some so I will be watching this to see what peoples input is on this as far as a good size, style and construction . M[/b]
Make sure you know what works either from testing them yourself or from having them tested by others if you plan to get into the market. There's actually quite a bit of stuff out there already if you look around. Some sled builders have never really put their stuff to the test before they build their product. I can name a lot of junk. Of course even junk works when the conditions are easy. Metal sleds are usually the weakest and least able to take stress and pounding.
 

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I love the Otter sleds, there is nothing to break on them even fully loaded they slide very easy.The Otters mounts lower then alot of other slays so when I get into deep snow and slush it keeps the front end up.. I have had mine for 5 years and it,s still in sxecellent shape..Well worth looking into....I am not even sure that they sell them in the states...Just my opinion but I have seen alot of steel ones break down because of broken welds, broken skis, etc..etc..not worth the hassle ...MIne is the medium one but they do make a xlarge one ...The website if interested is www.otteroutdoors.com
 

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The Otters came and went in this part of Alaska. I'm sure they might work fine in some places. (They are the heat and vacuum type construction I referred to in a previous post.) They crack all to pieces when you use them in the cold (sub-zero F) and on anything that isn't a nice cushion of snow.
 

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This is what we use for our 5 mile ride to the cabin... CLICK

Works great and has a lot of places to tie or put bungies. Big enough to ride out on. Folds for easy transportation. And you can make this for the dogs, fits btwn the rails




Mark I will bring it to the shop if you want to see it.
 
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